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Home :: Archive :: 2005 :: March ::
Othello's Name
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0471  Monday, 14 March 2005

[1]     From:   Joachim Martillo <
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        Date:   Friday, 11 Mar 2005 10:12:56 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0462 Othello's Name

[2]     From:   Bruce Richman <
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        Date:   Friday, 11 Mar 2005 10:28:11 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0462 Othello's Name

[3]     From:   Bill Arnold <
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        Date:   Friday, 11 Mar 2005 12:14:29 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0462 Othello's Name

[4]     From:   Martin Steward <
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        Date:   Friday, 11 Mar 2005 19:00:13 -0000
        Subj:   SHK 16.0462 Othello's Name


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Joachim Martillo <
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Date:           Friday, 11 Mar 2005 10:12:56 EST
Subject: 16.0462 Othello's Name
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0462 Othello's Name

I am just repeating an equation between Jacob and Autolykus that many
mythographers have been making for centuries.  In modern times Graves
discusses it in his books on Greek and Hebrew mythology.  In the modern
period, Scaliger and Bernays mention this equation, and, if I am not
mistaken, it goes back to ancient mythographers.  I have to confess that
I have never checked the references.

Remember that in the Hellenistic period guile, treachery, trickery and
dishonesty were not necessarily considered bad traits.  The great hero
Odysseus, the grandson of Autolykus, was renowned for his lying and his
slyness.

Joachim Martillo

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bruce Richman <
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Date:           Friday, 11 Mar 2005 10:28:11 -0600
Subject: 16.0462 Othello's Name
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0462 Othello's Name

Furthermore to Don Bloom's comment, Hebrew prayer regularly refers to
the bound triad of "Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob" as the most venerated
forefathers. The name is fully respected in Jewish teaching.

Bruce Richman

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bill Arnold <
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Date:           Friday, 11 Mar 2005 12:14:29 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 16.0462 Othello's Name
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0462 Othello's Name

D Bloom writes, "Although Jacob is somewhat problematic for his
craftiness (like many scriptural figures), he remains venerated as the
immediate father of 'the Children Of Israel'-his other name, of course.
Countless male babies-Jewish and Christian-have been named for him,
including two of Jesus' disciples and one of his brothers.  Or is there
another Jacob?"

Well, of course, given that it was the *Jacobean* era, and King James I
was on the throne when *Othello* was supposedly first presented, circa
1604, was he not the "other Jacob"?  So, does this put a new twist on
the play?

Bill Arnold
http://www.cwru.edu/affil/edis/scholars/arnold.htm

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Martin Steward <
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Date:           Friday, 11 Mar 2005 19:00:13 -0000
Subject: Othello's Name
Comment:        SHK 16.0462 Othello's Name

"Or is there another Jacob?"

There was one sitting on the throne at the time.

m

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