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Home :: Archive :: 2005 :: March ::
Dictionary
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0487  Wednesday, 16 March 2005

[1]     From:   William Godshalk <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 15 Mar 2005 13:30:04 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0477 Dictionary

[2]     From:   Hardy M. Cook <
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        Date:   Wednesday, March 16, 2005
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0477 Dictionary

[3]     From:   Alec Wild <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 15 Mar 2005 13:38:15 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0477 Dictionary

[4]     From:   Nora Kreimer <
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        Date:   Tuesday, 15 Mar 2005 15:58:47 -0300
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0477 Dictionary


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Godshalk <
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Date:           Tuesday, 15 Mar 2005 13:30:04 -0500
Subject: 16.0477 Dictionary
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0477 Dictionary

Probably the Oxford English Dictionary is best. And you can get an
online account.

David and Ben Crystal have compiled a glossary called Shakespeare's
Words, and of course there's Alexander Schmidt's Shakespeare Lexicon
which I find very useful.  I suppose I should mention Onions's A
Shakespeare Glossary, though I don't find it terribly helpful. Gordon
Williams's Glossary and his Dictionary of Shakespeare's sexual language
(two different entities) are excellent.

Bill Godshalk

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Hardy M. Cook <
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Date:           Wednesday, March 16, 2005
Subject: 16.0477 Dictionary
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0477 Dictionary

Frank Whigham <
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 > reminded me that in April of 1998,
I posted a message about the usefulness of the Early Modern English
Dictionaries Database (EMEDD) in response to a query he made about how
Elizabethans would typically use "tribe." I found my original posting in
the archives at the website
<http://www.shaksper.net/archives/1998/0383.html> and reproduce it below.

A link to the EMEDD as well as links to the Perseus Project electronic
versions of Onions (mentioned by Bill Godshalk above) and Schmidt
(mentioned by Alec Wild below) can be found in my "A Selected Guide to
Shakespeare on the Internet (Revised 08/31/04)"
<http://www.shaksper.net/archives/files/internet.sites.html>. The Guide
also has links to E. A. Abbott's A Shakespearean Grammar, the work that
Jonathan Hope's Shakespeare's Grammar supersedes (mention yesterday
http://www.shaksper.net/archives/2005/0475.html) and Alexander Dyce's A
General Glossary to Shakespeare's Works, another reference that would be
useful in addressing Mark Alexander's question.

Here is the original posting, but I should add that the database has
been complete for many years now:

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 9.0379  Tuesday, 21 April 1998.

From:           Hardy M. Cook <
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Date:           Tuesday, April 21, 1998
Subject:        The Early Modern English Dictionaries Database and "tribe"

Frank Whigham's question, "So: when would Elizabethans typically use the
term "tribe"?" provides the perfect opportunity for me to describe what
I consider one of the most useful tools on the World Wide Web available
to the Early Modern scholar: Ian Lancashire's *The Early Modern English
Dictionaries Database* (EMEDD).

Professor Lancashire in the first paragraph of his "Overview of the
EMEDD" describes the project this way:

Antonio Zampolli urges computational linguists to re-use existing
lexicographical resources rather than to make them anew (Zampolli 1983;
Calzolari and Zampolli 1991). Robin Alston (1966), Sch

 

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