2005

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0496  Thursday, 17 March 2005

[1]     From:   Peter Bridgman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 16 Mar 2005 16:41:38 -0000
        Subj:   SHK 16.0472 Shakespeare's Personal Faith

[2]     From:   D Bloom <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 16 Mar 2005 11:56:10 -0600
        Subj:   RE: SHK 16.0488 Shakespeare's Personal Faith


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter Bridgman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 16 Mar 2005 16:41:38 -0000
Subject: Shakespeare's Personal Faith
Comment:        SHK 16.0472 Shakespeare's Personal Faith

Abigail Quart writes ...

 >thoughtful Hamlet is from Protestant Wittenburg.
 >95-theses-on-a-church-door Wittenburg. Rash Laertes, however, returns
 >from Catholic Paris. St.-Bartholomew's-Day-Massacre Paris. Shakespeare
 >couldn't have drawn a clearer, more deliberate contrast.

If Abigail Quart is correct in her assertion that Hamlet and Laertes
represent Protestantism and Catholicism respectively, this has
interesting implications for Hamlet's line: 'I'll take the ghost's word
for a thousand pound'.

Since the Ghost claimed he came from purgatory, young Hamlet is
presumably now rejecting his new-fangled Lutheran education in favour of
traditional Catholic eschatology.

Peter Bridgman

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           D Bloom <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 16 Mar 2005 11:56:10 -0600
Subject: 16.0488 Shakespeare's Personal Faith
Comment:        RE: SHK 16.0488 Shakespeare's Personal Faith

Abigail Quart responds:

 >It doesn't matter what Laertes was going to Paris for. He was going to
 >Paris and he returned from PARIS. Hamlet was returned from WITTENBURG.
 >Do you believe that Shakespeare made careless references? I don't. And
 >the argument about Never-Never-Land is disingenuous. Shakespeare was
 >using loaded words with significance to his Elizabethan audience. They
 >knew what happened in Wittenburg. They knew what happened in Paris.

Polonius certainly knew what happened in Paris:

924: But yf't be he I meane, hee's very wilde,
925: Adicted so and so, and there put on him
926: What forgeries you please, marry none so ranck
927: As may dishonour him, take heede of that,
928: But sir, such wanton, wild, and vsuall slips,
929: As are companions noted and most knowne
930: To youth and libertie.

Rey.

931: As gaming my Lord.

Pol.

932: I, or drinking, fencing, swearing,
933: Quarrelling, drabbing, you may goe so far.

This may be a you go to your church and I'll go to mine issue, but I
think Elizabethans would think first of what Polonius thinks of in
regard to Paris, and only secondarily of learned doctors or merciless
massacres.

By the way, is there any clear association of Laertes with Univ of P?

Cheers,
don

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