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Home :: Archive :: 2005 :: March ::
Words Ending in eth/th
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0540  Wednesday, 23 March 2005

[1]     From:   William Godshalk <
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 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 22 Mar 2005 20:13:10 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0527 Words Ending in eth/th

[2]     From:   Ros King <
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 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 23 Mar 2005 14:23:50 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0527 Words Ending in eth/th


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Godshalk <
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 >
Date:           Tuesday, 22 Mar 2005 20:13:10 -0500
Subject: 16.0527 Words Ending in eth/th
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0527 Words Ending in eth/th

I got this response from Randy McLeod offline:

In Arnold's "The Hayswater Boat", he says "moves" and "moveth" in the
same line, and unless you pronounce the first as a mono-syllable and the
second as a disyllable, the meter won't work.  I opined that in Eliz
times, the spelling may not have specified the number of syllables, but
I don't think I had a specific example. I would have said all this in my
article "Spellbound" which appeared in an old-spelling conference volume
edited by Shady and Shand-and also in Renaissance and Reformation.

Quoting Randy, I remain,
Bill Godshalk

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ros King <
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 >
Date:           Wednesday, 23 Mar 2005 14:23:50 +0000
Subject: 16.0527 Words Ending in eth/th
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0527 Words Ending in eth/th

William Godshalk <
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 >

 >Some years ago while reading an essay by Randall McLeod I found that
 >Randy had found some evidence that words ending in eth/th were
 >pronounced in the seventeenth century (if not before) as if they ended
 >in s. For example, hath was pronounced has. To make a long story short,
 >I didn't write the reference down, and now I can't find it. Does anyone
 >have this information to hand?
 >
 >I have been looking for Randy's email address, to no avail. I guess I
 >could always use the telephone.
 >
 >Bill

I don't have Randy's reference but I came to the same conclusion when I
was editing the Works of Richard Edwards (MUP, 2001) and modernised
accordingly.

Best,
Ros


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