2005

Shakespeare's Personal Faith

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0510  Friday, 18 March 2005

[1]     From:   Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 16 Mar 2005 13:07:16 -0500
        Subj:   SHK 16.0488 Shakespeare's Personal Faith

[2]     From:   Richard Kennedy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 17 Mar 2005 20:02:34 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0496 Shakespeare's Personal Faith


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 16 Mar 2005 13:07:16 -0500
Subject: Shakespeare's Personal Faith
Comment:        SHK 16.0488 Shakespeare's Personal Faith

The idea that you can dredge up an author's 'personal faith' by means of
a close analysis of his or her writings derives from a number of sloppy
post-Romantic presuppositions. Suffice it to say that you can't. The
really interesting question is why any of us should collude in the
reduction of art to the level of mere individual belief. Our pop stars
will do that for us.

T. Hawkes

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Richard Kennedy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 17 Mar 2005 20:02:34 -0800
Subject: 16.0496 Shakespeare's Personal Faith
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0496 Shakespeare's Personal Faith

There's that hearsay, rumor, or what have you that Shakespeare spent at
a thousand pounds a year, or received such, I don't think it's clear.
Something also about playing the ghost of Hamlet. If one can believe
that there is often something deeper than the paint of Elizabethan
prose, take 'word' to stand for 'name', and surmise. "I'll take the
ghost's word for a thousand pound."

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Dictionary

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0509  Friday, 18 March 2005

From:           David Crystal <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 17 Mar 2005 17:27:02 -0000
Subject: 16.0487 Dictionary
Comment:        RE: SHK 16.0487 Dictionary

Bill Godshalk kindly mentions the Glossary Ben and I compiled a couple
of years back.  Note that this is also available online at
www.shakespeareswords.com. The main difference is that the online
database (linked to a concordance) contains all the instances of each
glossary word that turns up in the works (including Edward III, by the
way), far more than we could fit into the book.

David Crystal

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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
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editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Evolution of English

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0507  Friday, 18 March 2005

[1]     From:   Joe Conlon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 17 Mar 2005 18:57:35 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0493 Evolution of English

[2]     From:   Nora Kreimer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 17 Mar 2005 21:08:04 -0300
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0493 Evolution of English

[3]     From:   Kathy Dent <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 18 Mar 2005 00:18:32 +0000
        Subj:   RE: SHK 16.0493 Evolution of English

[4]     From:   John W. Kennedy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 17 Mar 2005 19:29:49 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0493 Evolution of English

[5]     From:   Susan St. John <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Thursday, 17 Mar 2005 21:50:16 -0700
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0493 Evolution of English

[6]     From:   Edward Brown <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 18 Mar 2005 06:25:52 -0600
        Subj:   RE: SHK 16.0493 Evolution of English

[7]     From:   William Sutton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 18 Mar 2005 04:56:17 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0493 Evolution of English


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Joe Conlon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 17 Mar 2005 18:57:35 -0500
Subject: 16.0493 Evolution of English
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0493 Evolution of English

You might want to try The Story of English by Robert McCrum, William
Cran, and Robert MacNeil.  Description is available at Amazon
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0140154051/qid=1111103477/sr=2-1/ref=pd_bbs_b_2_1/103-0885029-6811029

This book was a tie-in to the PBS series on the development of the
language.  The mini-series itself was quite interesting -- particularly
the chapter on Shakespeare's English.  I would think this would be of
interest to your students.  I work with tenth graders and I've used the
video of that chapter in some of my work.

Joe Conlon
Warsaw Indiana

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Nora Kreimer <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 17 Mar 2005 21:08:04 -0300
Subject: 16.0493 Evolution of English
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0493 Evolution of English

There is a marvelous PBS mini-series with a companion book on The Story
of English, Viking 1986. Robert McCrum, William Cran, and Robert
MacNeil, the latter being the host of this miniseries in 9 episodes.

Regards,
Nora Kreimer

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kathy Dent <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 18 Mar 2005 00:18:32 +0000
Subject: 16.0493 Evolution of English
Comment:        RE: SHK 16.0493 Evolution of English

 >I am teaching a short course to an 11th grade class on the history of
 >English.  It focuses on the evolution of the English language and
 >literature from the beginning (whenever that is) through the
 >Renaissance.  I am looking for information on what might be appropriate
 >to this age group, if there are any topics I should focus on, sources I
 >would find helpful, and idea on how to make this interesting to 16-17
 >year olds.

For the language, Melvyn Bragg's recent book _The Adventure of English_
is very accessible and written in a lively way. The early chapters
provide an easy introduction to the historical events that caused
important developments in English and he explains how modern British
regional accents and dialects still show the signs of very early
influences.  He also does a great job of including more recent changes
in English (from the American Frontier to Australia, India, the
Caribbean and African American and even glancing at text messaging) and
I think this may be a good 'hook' to get teenagers interested in how
language changes over time.

Kathy Dent

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John W. Kennedy <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 17 Mar 2005 19:29:49 -0500
Subject: 16.0493 Evolution of English
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0493 Evolution of English

Hannah Lemberg <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

 >I am teaching a short course to an 11th grade class on the history of
 >English.  It focuses on the evolution of the English language and
 >literature from the beginning (whenever that is) through the
 >Renaissance.  I am looking for information on what might be appropriate
 >to this age group, if there are any topics I should focus on, sources I
 >would find helpful, and idea on how to make this interesting to 16-17
 >year olds.

Well, assuming that they've been reading Tolkien (a better than usual
bet, just now), one obvious starting point lies in his fiction that he
translated the entire Middle-Earth corpus from the actual memoirs of
Bilbo and Frodo Baggins, and, in order to illustrate the relationship
between the language spoken by the Hobbits (which he was "translating"
into MnE) and the language spoken in Rohan, he "translated" the latter
into Old English. He goes into many details of his fictional translation
process.

I don't know whether you'd get complaints about Caedmon.

There is a movie due to come out this year called "Beowulf & Grendel". I
have no idea whether it will be any good, of course.

Since you seem to be in a public school, I do /not/ recommend (if you
value your job) looking at the recent BBC series of dramas based on the
"Canterbury Tales". But any normal HS English text will give a taste of
Chaucer, anyway.

Since I suppose you are not actually trying to teach them OE or ME, do
not forget "Sir Gawayn and 


The Elizabethan Star Chamber

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0508  Friday, 18 March 2005

From:           Christine Mack Gordon <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 16 Mar 2005 11:58:50 CST
Subject: The Elizabethan Star Chamber
Comment:        SHK 16.0463 The Elizabethan Star Chamber

Although the existence of the School of Night is not something that is
likely to be proved (or disproved), it is still an interesting idea.
Fiction writers love this sort of thing, and Alan Wall has written a
novel I enjoyed called (of course) _The School of Night_. If you aren't
interested in facts, but enjoy speculation, I would recommend it.

Chris Gordon

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Renaissance Drama Anthologies

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0506  Friday, 18 March 2005

From:           Jack Heller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 18 Mar 2005 09:15:43 -0500 (EST)
Subject:        Renaissance Drama Anthologies

Colleagues:

I am anticipating a course in the fall on Renaissance drama. I would
like to emphasize Marlowe, Jonson, and Middleton. What anthologies are
best for a particularly strong sampling of these dramatists' works?

Jack Heller
Huntington College

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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