2005

Thomas Morley

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0429  Tuesday, 8 March 2005

From:           Hannibal Hamlin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 05 Mar 2005 13:50:48 -0500
Subject: 16.0406 Thomas Morley
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0406 Thomas Morley

In response to Peter Bridgman's very interesting note, the possibility
of a connection between Morley and the courtier Henry Nowell (or Noel --
if indeed this is the man) is most intriguing, since this courtier was
also connected to John Dowland.  Dowland, always desperate for a court
position, was on the verge (it seems) of getting one through Henry Noel.
  Noel's untimely death in 1597 shattered Dowland's hopes, however, and
the composer's disappointment is powerfully expressed in "Mr. Henry
Noell his funerall psalmes," sophisticated four-part settings of
metrical Psalms from Sternhold and Hopkins and elsewhere, which may have
been performed (speculation really, but tantalizing) at Noel's funeral
in Westminster Abbey.  Like Morley, Dowland was also Catholic, though
how long and to what extent he remained so is open to debate.  There
seem to be lots of interesting question here worth pursuing further.

Hannibal

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Pinter's Lear

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0428  Tuesday, 8 March 2005

[1]     From:   Herb Weil <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 04 Mar 2005 12:15:14 -0800
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0409 Pinter's Lear

[2]     From:   Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 6 Mar 2005 11:40:55 -0500
        Subj:   SHK 16.0400 Pinter's Lear


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Herb Weil <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 04 Mar 2005 12:15:14 -0800
Subject: 16.0409 Pinter's Lear
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0409 Pinter's Lear

There is a tape in Polish, but I have no details.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 6 Mar 2005 11:40:55 -0500
Subject: Pinter's Lear
Comment:        SHK 16.0400 Pinter's Lear

The announcement that Harold Pinter is to give up playwriting has caused
dancing in the streets of Britain.  However, the prospect of his yet
unperformed screenplay of 'King Lear' still harrows us with fear and
wonder. The challenge to the Education Department of the Globe Theatre
is clear.  If, as reported, their rendition of Othello can persuade an
audience to 'create their own designs for Othello's handkerchief,
"spotted with strawberries", using resource materials on Islamic design
created by the Prince's School of Traditional Arts', then surely the
merest whiff of a Pinterised 'King Lear' should have them scurrying to
knit sweaters for the treatment of senile dementia, scarves for the
discouragement of sibling rivalry and underwear for the prevention of
unnatural longings? The School of Traditional Arts will be agog.

T. Hawkes

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There's Magic in the Web

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0426  Tuesday, 8 March 2005

[1]     From:   Elliott Stone <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 4 Mar 2005 14:05:35 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0404 There's Magic in the Web

[2]     From:   Bill Arnold <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 4 Mar 2005 14:47:45 -0800 (PST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0404 There's Magic in the Web


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Elliott Stone <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 4 Mar 2005 14:05:35 -0500
Subject: 16.0404 There's Magic in the Web
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0404 There's Magic in the Web

Strawberries on the Othello handkerchief are a sexual symbol rather than
a peace symbol. But whatever works!

Elliott H. Stone

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bill Arnold <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 4 Mar 2005 14:47:45 -0800 (PST)
Subject: 16.0404 There's Magic in the Web
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0404 There's Magic in the Web

John Webb writes, "Five actors focus on the journey of a sumptuous
Islamic handkerchief, Othello's first love token to his wife, and trace
Othello's growing distrust of Desdemona's fidelity. In the play he kills
her. In "There's Magic in the Web", the students are asked by Desdemona
to prove her innocence."

Over here, in the States, as in *United States,* a person is "innocent
until proven guilty," and so, in our minds as readers, there is no
burden of proof upon the victim in *Othello* to prove anything.  We
would be asking of Othello his proof of his lady's guilt in his eyes?

So, I ask, in Shakespeare's time, in Law, was there a burden upon
victims of an accusation to prove their innocence?

Bill Arnold
http://www.cwru.edu/affil/edis/scholars/arnold.htm

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Venetian Usury

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0427  Tuesday, 8 March 2005

From:           Bruce Richman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 4 Mar 2005 14:09:48 -0600
Subject: 16.0410 Venetian Usury
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0410 Venetian Usury

Old Ez made a lot of mistakes, but this time the mistake was mine. I
typed 16th century when I meant 15th. A second, less financially astute
Cosimo de Medici, Duke of Florence and Tuscany, lived from 1519-1574,
but he's not who I was referring to. Apologies to one and all.

D Bloom <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

 >Bruce Richman:
 >
 >"Ezra Pound's Cantos XXV and XXVI address the debasement of art and
 >culture in 16th century Venice by usury and manipulations of credit.
 >Although Pound is well-known to have vilified Jews as usurers, the
 >usurious practices in the Venetian Cantos are not those of small-time
 >businessmen like Shylock, but of major institutional players like the
 >Florentine Cosimo de Medici, who routinely did business in Venice
 >("almost as a Venetian to Venice" Canto XXVI) and manipulated the money
 >supply throughout Europe by calling in international debts that couldn't
 >be paid. Florence was the banking capital, but Venice was the center of
 >brokerage, and lending money at high interest to governments and
 >nobility was a regular activity among wealthy and influential Christians."
 >
 >This did not square with my memories of Renaissance history, so I
 >checked and indeed Cosimo died in 1464. Whether this lapse occurred in
 >Pound or in the typing of the letter, it is important to keep these
 >Medicis straight since there were such a flaming lot of them. In any
 >case, Pound seems to be dead wrong, for surely it was the rapid
 >expansion of trade-especially in money-that paid for the amazing
 >outpouring of Renaissance art, starting in Italy, moving to their main
 >trading partners in Flanders and its environs, and then spreading to the
 >rest of Europe.
 >
 >(Also, the Knights Templar were involved in this business before the
 >Florentines.)

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Shakespeare's Personal Faith

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0425  Tuesday, 8 March 2005

[1]     From:   John D. Cox <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 4 Mar 2005 13:56:34 -0500
        Subj:   Shakespeare's personal faith

[2]     From:   Peter Bridgman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Saturday, 5 Mar 2005 14:38:41 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0405 Shakespeare's Personal Faith

[3]     From:   Ira Zinman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Sunday, 6 Mar 2005 19:17:25 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0405 Shakespeare's Personal Faith


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John D. Cox <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 4 Mar 2005 13:56:34 -0500
Subject:        Shakespeare's personal faith

Marvin Krims raises an interesting question about Shakespeare's personal
faith. I do not see how it can be answered in the complete absence of
any statement aside from the plays and poems themselves. We can say that
Shakespeare did not write as flamboyantly as Marlowe, where questioning
faith is concerned, but does it follow that Shakespeare's personal faith
was more orthodox than Marlowe's? I think there's room for generalizing
more fruitfully about a consistent religious and ethical vision in the
plays and poems, but it has to be done with great tact and care, and
even when it is done, it doesn't tell us what Shakespeare believed; it
just tells us what he wrote. This goes for the prevailing assumption
that he was deeply skeptical as well.

John Cox
Hope College

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter Bridgman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Saturday, 5 Mar 2005 14:38:41 -0000
Subject: 16.0405 Shakespeare's Personal Faith
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0405 Shakespeare's Personal Faith

Marvin Krims asks ...

 >What do members of this List think about Shakespeare's personal faith as
 >can be gathered from the little that is known about him as a person and
 >what can be inferred from his writings. I am not interested in the issue
 >of Catholic vs. Protestant but rather what can be said about his own
 >spiritual beliefs.

If Marvin is not "interested in the issue of Catholic vs. Protestant" he
is not going to get very far in answering this question.  When WS was
born the vast majority of his fellow Englishmen and women were of the
"old faith", hoping for a return to Marian Catholicism once Mary Stuart
(next in line) became queen; when WS died the majority of these men and
women had changed their allegiance to the new Anglican faith.  This
cultural revolution, the major event of WS' lifetime, had a profound
effect on both art (there is no British pre-reformation art in the
National Gallery) and literature (which blossomed to fill the images
vacuum) and would have had a profound effect on WS' personal faith.

Peter Bridgman

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Ira Zinman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Sunday, 6 Mar 2005 19:17:25 EST
Subject: 16.0405 Shakespeare's Personal Faith
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0405 Shakespeare's Personal Faith

Marvin Krims submitted the following:

 >What do members of this List think about Shakespeare's personal faith as
 >can be gathered from the little that is known about him as a person and
 >what can be inferred from his writings. I am not interested in the issue
 >of Catholic vs. Protestant but rather what can be said about his own
 >spiritual beliefs.

My response to Mr. Krims is based on writing the deeper spiritual
interpretations to be found in Shakespeare's Sonnets.  Shakespeare's
Sonnets reveal to me a man whose consciousness of the Spiritual is
deeply engrained within him.   He is not only well versed in scripture,
as several Sonnets and passages from his plays indicate, (see also
Noble, Shaheen, Battenhouse, Milward, Lings, Marx, Huxley, G. Wilson
Knight, to name a few), but his sense of the esoteric nature of Man's
battle between the  egotistic self versus the Spiritual is understood,
as by someone who has tread this path and successfully overcome many of
its travails. Finally, the devotional aspects that I find in the Sonnets
remind me of the Nobel Laureate RabindranathTagore, and many of the
revered Christian writers who were Shakespeare's predecessors and
contemporaries.

I appreciate Mr. Krims inquiry, as I believe the depth of Shakespeare's
spirituality is not often enough appreciated.

With best wishes,
Ira Zinman

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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