2005

Shakespeare Statistics?

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0590  Wednesday, 30 March 2005

From:           Ward Elliott <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 29 Mar 2005 21:22:53 -0800
Subject: 16.0576 Shakespeare Statistics?
Comment:        RE: SHK 16.0576 Shakespeare Statistics?

We are the ones who spend our time counting Shakespeare and writing our
book, Shakespeare by the Numbers.  When Al Magary asks for semi-accurate
statistics on murders, battles, lewd acts, etc. in Shakespeare (SHK
16.0576) we can't help straining like greyhounds in the slips, even
though, in fact, we have never thought of counting such things.

On the other hand, we do have reams of statistics about the size of
Shakespeare's known and inferred vocabulary, the rates at which he
introduces new or rare words, how his coined words compare with those of
George Bush, and what his normal ranges are of grade level, feminine
endings, hyphenated compound words, enclitic microphrases, and 50 other
measurements which can distinguish him from others.  All, we hope, will
be made manifest when the book is finished.  In the meantime, I think it
is still not too late to order a copy of the Tennessee Law Review, Vol.
72 (2004) Who Wrote Shakespeare? symposium, which is loaded with
Shakespeare range statistics, but says very little about his vocabulary,
and nothing at all about the number of murders and battles.  But it's a
steal for $13.  Send $13 to

Micki Fox
College of Law
University of Tennessee, Knoxville
1505 West Cumberland Ave.
Knoxville, TN 37996-1810

and hope the issue has not been sent to the printer.

If anyone has actual answers to Al's questions, we would like to know;
it would make a cute footnote.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Representations of the Living

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0589  Wednesday, 30 March 2005

[1]     From:   Bob Grumman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 29 Mar 2005 11:20:03 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0571 Representations of the Living

[2]     From:   Norman Hinton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 29 Mar 2005 11:14:55 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0571 Representations of the Living

[3]     From:   Julia Griffin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 29 Mar 2005 15:24:47 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0571 Representations of the Living

[4]     From:   John Briggs <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Tuesday, 29 Mar 2005 22:03:01 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0571 Representations of the Living

[5]     From:   Bill Lloyd <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 30 Mar 2005 06:42:15 EST
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0571 Representations of the Living


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bob Grumman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 29 Mar 2005 11:20:03 -0500
Subject: 16.0571 Representations of the Living
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0571 Representations of the Living

 >Prior to Middleton and Dekker's The Roaring Girl, was there any play
 >purporting to represent a then-living person? Did this occur in ancient
 >drama? Are there other examples in Elizabethan & Jacobean times? For
 >this last question, I would include A Game at Chess, even though there
 >was "hiding in plain sight" the persons being represented. I would like
 >to exclude from the answers persons who had recently died, such as Queen
 >Elizabeth in Heywood's history plays.
 >
 >Suggestions are appreciated.

As I'm sure others will quickly tell you, Aristophanes did--some guy
named Socrates, for instance.

--Bob G.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Norman Hinton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 29 Mar 2005 11:14:55 -0600
Subject: 16.0571 Representations of the Living
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0571 Representations of the Living

Aristophanes put Socrates on the stage (the two are contemporaries), and
Aristophanes has allusions to literally dozens of living Athenians by
name in his plays.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Julia Griffin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 29 Mar 2005 15:24:47 -0500
Subject: 16.0571 Representations of the Living
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0571 Representations of the Living

Certainly it happens in ancient comedy - The Clouds of Aristophanes is
probably the best-known example.  I think the only example in ancient
tragedy is Aeschylus' The Persians, in which the Persian King Xerxes and
his mother lament a Greek victory in which many of the audience will
have taken part a few years before.  They are, of course, foreigners to
that audience.  The same applies to the personnel of Sir John Van Olden
Barnavelt (1619), an extremely topical play.  Representing one's own
compatriots is clearly a different thing - probably less common?

Julia Griffin

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Briggs <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 29 Mar 2005 22:03:01 +0100
Subject: 16.0571 Representations of the Living
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0571 Representations of the Living

Jack Heller wrote:

 >Prior to Middleton and Dekker's The Roaring Girl, was there any play
 >purporting to represent a then-living person?

I suppose that depends upon the ontological status of Christopher Sly.

John Briggs

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bill Lloyd <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 30 Mar 2005 06:42:15 EST
Subject: 16.0571 Representations of the Living
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0571 Representations of the Living

Wasn't Socrates still alive when Aristophanes lampooned him?

These are perhaps special instances of living persons appearing on stage:

In Webster's Induction to Marston's Malcontent [1604] the players
Richard Burbage, John Lowin and Henry Condell appear on stage in propria
persona; and in the academic play Return from Parnassus Part II [1601]
Burbage and Will Kempe appear as characters. Both are pre-Roaring Girl.

Post 1608, there's the Prince of Orange [and perhaps other characters?]
in Fletcher and Massinger's Barnavelt.

In a similar case, were any of the historical Spanish generals or
soldiers who spoiled Antwerp in 1576 still alive when they were depicted
in Alarum for London [c1599]?

And though I haven't made a survey I suspect that at least some
characters in plays on recent French history [such as Marlowe's Massacre
at Paris, or several of Chapman's plays] still would have been alive
when those plays were on the London stage. I haven't the patience to sit
down with the castlists and a history of France [or Google] but there
might well be some to find there.

Bill Lloyd

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Upcoming Event

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0587  Wednesday, 30 March 2005

From:           John F. Andrews <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 29 Mar 2005 13:52:46 -0500
Subject:        Upcoming Event

Talking About the Folger's Upcoming "Clandestine Marriage" With its
Producer, Director, and Leading Actors

A SPRIGHTLY PROGRAM ABOUT AN 18TH-CENTURY CLASSIC

MONDAY, APRIL 11

Cash Bar 6:00, Dinner 7:00, Program 7:30 p.m.

WOMAN'S NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC CLUB, 1526 New Hampshire Avenue NW

$30 for Attendees Who Register Through the ESU or The Shakespeare Guild

In collaboration with the Folger Shakespeare Library and the Woman's
National Democratic Club, the English-Speaking Union is pleased to
co-host an event at which four artists who are reviving an 18th-century
classic by David Garrick and George Colman will supply a preview of The
Clandestine Marriage. In this hilarious comedy, a prudent father, Mr.
Sterling, resolves that his daughters, Fanny and Betsey, will marry men
of wealth. His ambitions encounter complications, of course, and what
ensues is a romp through the English countryside.

With us for a charming evening of conversation will be Janet Alexander
Griffin, a versatile producer of performing arts and literary programs
who has garnered numerous awards during her two decades at the Library.
Also on hand will be Richard Clifford, a prominent London actor who has
appeared in several of Kenneth Branagh's films (among them Henry V,
Love's Labours' Lost, and Much Ado About Nothing) and earned accolades
as director of such previous Folger hits as All's Well That Ends Well,
Elizabeth the Queen, and She Stoops to Conquer. Completing our panel
will be two of Washington's most popular performers, Catherine Flye, an
actress, director, producer, and playwright who oversees the Interact
Theatre and whose credits include more than 45 nominations for Helen
Hayes Awards in nearly a dozen local venues, and Ted van Griethuysen, a
mainstay at The Shakespeare Theatre, where he has garnered critical
plaudits and delighted playgoers in leading roles for more than fifteen
years, and at Studio Theatre, where he recently won acclaim as the elder
A. E. Housman in a stellar production of Tom Stoppard's Invention of Love.

For more details on The Clandestine Marriage, which will be staged in
the Folger Theatre from April 15 through May 22 (with discounted tickets
available for $25 to those who cite this announcement), call (202)
544-7077. For information about a related exhibition, David Garrick
(1717-1779), A Theatrical Life, visit www.folger.edu.

To obtain more information about, and make reservations for, any of the
programs described above, simply reply to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call
Executive Director John F. Andrews at (202) 234-4602. The ESU will be
happy to process orders that are placed with MasterCard and Visa accounts.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Memorial for Janet Field-Pickering

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0588  Wednesday, 30 March 2005

From:           Jeremy Ehrlich <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 29 Mar 2005 11:53:02 -0500
Subject:        Memorial for Janet Field-Pickering

Dear friends,

The Folger Library has a short "In Memoriam" page posted on our website,
at http://www.folger.edu/template.cfm?cid=1447

I thought I'd pass this note from Janet Griffin on as well.

All best wishes,
Jeremy

-----Original Message-----
From: Janet Griffin
Sent: Tuesday, March 29, 2005 11:40 AM
Subject: FW: Memorial for Janet Field-Pickering

Dear Folger Family,

In honor of our dear colleague, I wanted to let you know that a memorial
service is being planned for her at the Folger.  It will be held on
Friday, May 20, at 4:00 p.m., and we hope that staff, other colleagues,
friends, and family will come together to remember her, to celebrate a
wonderful life.  That day is at the end of the children's festival, one
of the last major events on the education calendar here, and so a
fitting time to commemorate Janet's great work.

The Folger has also established a special fund in her name which will
support the education programs, like "Shakespeare Steps Out," which
Janet began, and other important outreach into schools.  If anyone wants
to remember Janet in that way, donations can be sent to Megan Daly.

Yours,
Janet

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

CFP: Shakespeare and the Exotic

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0586  Wednesday, 30 March 2005

From:           Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 29 Mar 2005 22:30:47 +0100
Subject:        CFP: Shakespeare and the Exotic

A further two weeks have been added to the deadline for the following
Call for Papers. Proposals will be taken up to 15 April 2005.

"Shakespeare and the Exotic"

The 2005 meeting of the British Shakespeare Association at the
University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne on 1-4 September 2005 will include a
seminar for 'Shakespeare and the Exotic' led by Joan Fitzpatrick
(University College Northampton) and Jane Kingsley-Smith (University of
Hull).  This seminar will focus on that which is exotic, or strange, in
Shakespeare's drama and poetry. Shakespeare has traditionally been
lauded as England's national poet and has been represented by some as a
spokesman for Englishness but increasingly scholars have attended to his
radical and nuanced exploration of the relationship between nationhood
(often a matter of cultural affiliations) and state-formation. The role,
or perceived role, of the individual within the state is determined by
nationality, ethnicity and language and any sense of that which is
exotic develops alongside (and even symbiotically within) the familiar.
Shakespeare is particularly alert to the tensions that emerge between
the two and the extent to which the exotic is incorporated is a point of
interest in many of his works.

Papers might usefully focus on changing national boundaries and the
impact of an increasingly multicultural early modern London upon those
who thought of themselves as English nationals and the degree to which
efforts to assimilate succeed or fail. Representations of that which
would have been considered unfamiliar to a typical early modern audience
or readership might include ethnic and religious minorities (Jews,
Muslims), foreigners (the Spanish, the Welsh), or the past (Rome,
Ancient Britain) or those categories that mediate between exotic and
familiar such as English Catholicism. The degree to which something is
viewed as strange and its perceived influence upon the dominant ideology
might be considered alongside early modern conceptions of the everyday
in order to establish and perhaps interrogate that which might have been
ordinarily accepted as 'the norm'. Shakespeare's use of exotic source
material, the relationship between his view of the exotic and that of
his contemporaries, and the impact of his views upon subsequent writers
are all possible topics for discussion. Other topics which might prove
useful include Shakespeare's treatment of foreign languages, food,
clothing or behaviour.

Please feel free to distribute this Call for Papers in any channels
available.

300-words abstracts of proposed papers should be sent the seminar
convenors: Joan Fitzpatrick (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) and Jane
Kingsley-Smith (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

Forwarded by Gabriel Egan

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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