2005

Shakespeare and the Spanish Delegation

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0408  Friday, 4 March 2005

From:           David Evett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 25 Feb 2005 15:58:20 -0500
Subject: 16.0353 Shakespeare and the Spanish Delegation
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0353 Shakespeare and the Spanish Delegation

 >David Evett observes that Measure for Measure was presented at court at
 >Christmastide, 1604, and adds that 'the company would have expected the
 >Spanish ambassador to report on it.'

T. Hawkes is quite right to bring me up short. I had just been reading
an essay that called attention to a visit by a large party from the
Spanish court in the fall of that year, and the reestablishment of
diplomatic relations, which reminded me that there are references to
court entertainments (including plays) in the regular dispatches of the
Spanish ambassador during James' reign. But some email daemon must have
provoked me to suggest that the actors would even have known of these,
much less supposed that their little interlude-however relevant to the
moment-would have been important enough to call for comment. Please
consider the suggestion withdrawn-at least until somebody confirms that
it happened.

David Evett

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Tempest on Film

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0407  Friday, 4 March 2005

From:           Kris McDermott <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 25 Feb 2005 11:45:33 -0500
Subject: 16.0388 Tempest on Film
Comment:        RE: SHK 16.0388 Tempest on Film

"McDermott goes on to credit Taymor with a Broadway production of The
Tempest with Patrick Stewart, but this is mistaken. Patrick Stewart did
appear on Broadway in a Tempest directed by George C. Wolfe, but Taymor
had nothing to do with this production."

M. Yawney is absolutely right, of course-I conflated my memory of the
production, with its Bunraku puppets and stilt-walking figures, with
Taymor's name and her designs for "The Lion King."  Barbara Pollitt
designed the masks and puppets for Wolfe's production.
Sorry about that.

Kris McDermott
Central Michigan University

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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Shakespeare's Personal Faith

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0405  Friday, 4 March 2005

From:           Marvin Bennet Krims <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 3 Mar 2005 16:40:29 -0500
Subject:        Inquiry: Shakespeare's Personal Faith

What do members of this List think about Shakespeare's personal faith as
can be gathered from the little that is known about him as a person and
what can be inferred from his writings. I am not interested in the issue
of Catholic vs. Protestant but rather what can be said about his own
spiritual beliefs.

        Marvin Krims

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Thomas Morley

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0406  Friday, 4 March 2005

[1]     From:   Hannibal Hamlin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 25 Feb 2005 14:59:38 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0385 Thomas Morley

[2]     From:   Peter Bridgman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 25 Feb 2005 20:04:34 -0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0385 Thomas Morley

[3]     From:   Norman Hinton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Friday, 25 Feb 2005 21:45:07 -0600
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0385 Thomas Morley


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Hannibal Hamlin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 25 Feb 2005 14:59:38 -0500
Subject: 16.0385 Thomas Morley
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0385 Thomas Morley

There seems to be no full biography (on a par with, say, Diana Pouton's
life of Dowland), but as much seems known about Morley as about anyone
else in his position from the period.  Michael W. Foster's essay in the
New Oxford Dictionary of National Biography is quite informative,
noting, for some particularly tantalizing tidbits, that Morley was
apparently a spy for Walsingham, and that he may (repeat, may) have
collaborated with Shakespeare.  The two apparently both lived for a time
in the parish of St. Helen's Bishopsgate, and "O mistress mine" (Twelfth
Night) and "It was a lover and his lass" (As You Like It) appear in
Morley's works.  Thurston Dart's foreword to the Norton edition of
Morley's A Plain and Easy Introduction to Practical Music is also
interesting, focusing on Morley's musical life (in addition to his
importance as a composer and church musician, he was also a major figure
in the development of music publishing, which lagged quite a ways behind
literary publishing).  The Plain and Easy Introduction is itself
interesting to scholars of literature, since it is a treatise cast in
the literary form of the dialogue, so popular in the Renaissance.

Hannibal

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter Bridgman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 25 Feb 2005 20:04:34 -0000
Subject: 16.0385 Thomas Morley
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0385 Thomas Morley

Judy Prince asks ...

 >Apart from his songs, his books, and C.V. salients, what do we know
 >about Thomas Morley's life?

We know he was a secret Catholic involved in anti-government activities.
This is from a letter dated 3 Oct 1591 from notorious double agent
Charles Paget to Thomas Phellippes, secretary to Elizabeth's spymaster
Sir Francis Walsingham....

"Ther is one Morley that playeth on the organes in poules [St Paul's]
that was with me in my house.  He seemed here to be a good Catholicke
and was reconsiled, but notwith-standing suspecting his behaviour I
entercepted letters that Mr. Nowell [possibly the Dean of St Paul's or
Henry Nowell, a courtier] wrote to him Wherby I discovered enoughe to
have hanged him. Nevertheles he shewing with teares great repentaunce,
and asking on his knees forgiveness, I was content to let him goe".

Phellippes's draft reply confirms Morley's activity: "It is true that
Morley the singing man employeth himself in that kind of service . and
hath browht diverse into danger".

Peter Bridgman

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Norman Hinton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 25 Feb 2005 21:45:07 -0600
Subject: 16.0385 Thomas Morley
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0385 Thomas Morley

Here's a little information about Morley:

http://home.sprintmail.com/~cwhent/Morley.html

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

There's Magic in the Web

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0404  Friday, 4 March 2005

From:           John Webb <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 1 Mar 2005 12:09:36 -0000
Subject:        There's Magic in the Web (Globe Project)

The article reproduced below is from The Times, 1st March 2005.

The headline is "Patrick Spottiswoode, director, Globe Education, on
taking Othello into faith-based schools".

A child's first encounter with Shakespeare should be "experiential". For
Shakespeare's Globe this means being an active player rather than a
passive audience member. As Shakespeare dramatised social, political and
emotional issues for his community, so we encourage children to consider
the same issues through "play".

"There's Magic in the Web" is Globe Education's first outreach project
to 63 primary and secondary schools in eight cities across the UK. It is
based on Othello and our exploration of Shakespeare and Islam last year.

Five actors focus on the journey of a sumptuous Islamic handkerchief,
Othello's first love token to his wife, and trace Othello's growing
distrust of Desdemona's fidelity. In the play he kills her. In "There's
Magic in the Web", the students are asked by Desdemona to prove her
innocence.

The performance encourages children to differentiate between opinion and
truth, judgement and justice. If they are successful, they should
prevent the tragedy from unfolding.

After the performance, the students will create their own designs for
Othello's handkerchief, "spotted with strawberries", using resource
materials on Islamic design created by the Prince's School of
Traditional Arts.

They will also design a handkerchief promoting peace. Two designs from
each city will be selected and embroidered professionally. These will
join more than 300 handkerchiefs from around the world and be sewn
together to create a Tent for Peace which will be on display at the
Globe in Islam Awareness Week in November.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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