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Home :: Archive :: 2005 :: April ::
Hamlet Question
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0628  Tuesday, 5 April 2005

[1]     From:   Cheryl Newton <
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        Date:   Friday, 01 Apr 2005 10:13:50 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0615 Hamlet Question

[2]     From:   Martin Steward <
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        Date:   Saturday, 2 Apr 2005 12:22:06 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0615 Hamlet Question

[3]     From:   Stephen C. Rose <
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        Date:   Sunday, 3 Apr 2005 20:51:18 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0615 Hamlet Question


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Cheryl Newton <
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Date:           Friday, 01 Apr 2005 10:13:50 -0500
Subject: 16.0615 Hamlet Question
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0615 Hamlet Question

Gene Tyburn <
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 >

 >"it hath made me mad. I say we will have no more marriage. / Those that
 >are married already (all but one) shall live, / the rest shall keep as
 >they are."
 >
 >Though I have been in this play three times,  I still don't know what
 >the heck these lines mean.  I would like some input from one of my
 >fellow students of the work

Maybe I'm too simplistic, but I understand it to mean that
Gertrude/Claudius' marriage has so soured him on the institution that he
wishes to eliminate it.  "All but one (Claudius) shall live; the rest
(other married couples) shall keep as they are," but no new marriages
will take place, which in theory (I don't think Hamlet was really so
naive) would also eliminate the breeding of sinners.

Cheryl Newton

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Martin Steward <
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 >
Date:           Saturday, 2 Apr 2005 12:22:06 +0100
Subject: 16.0615 Hamlet Question
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0615 Hamlet Question

 >it hath made me mad. I say we will have no moe marriage. / Those that
 >are married already (all but one) shall live, / the rest shall keep as
 >they are.

It has made me mad. I say that no two people shall marry in the future.
  Regarding those who are already married, they can live on [and remain
married?], with one exception [i.e. Claudius and Gertrude, because I'm
going to kill Claudius], the rest of humankind shall remain unmarried.

m

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stephen C. Rose <
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Date:           Sunday, 3 Apr 2005 20:51:18 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 16.0615 Hamlet Question
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0615 Hamlet Question

Gene Tyburn says:

 >I am interested in the meaning of HAMLET
 >3.1.146-149:
 >
 >"it hath made me mad. I say we will have no moe
 >marriage. / Those that
 >are married already (all but one) shall live, /
 >the rest shall keep as
 >they are."
 >
 >Though I have been in this play three times,  I
 >still don't know what
 >the heck these lines mean.  I would like some
 >input from one of my
 >fellow students of the work.

Possibly:

An echo of the New Testament-a notion that there will be no marriage
after death.

A way of suggesting that H and O were a possible match at one
point-something I feel is tenable. I am not sure from O's songs in her
"madness" are not hints that she and Hamlet have been intimate-possibly
even that she is pregnant.

The form of the statement seems oracular-but it is also somewhat like
certain "prophetic" statements in the Bible.

I a sure, whatever we make of H's madness, that his relationship with O
is a much larger piece of what this is all about than I am accustomed to
seeing maintained.

Cheers, S

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