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Home :: Archive :: 2005 :: April ::
Who Calls Kate Angry?
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0652  Thursday, 7 April 2005

[1]     From:   Phyllis Gorfain <
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        Date:   Thursday, 07 Apr 2005 07:33:43 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0625 Who Calls Kate Angry?

[2]     From:   James McClure <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 6 Apr 2005 20:33:59 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0639 Who Calls Kate Angry?


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Phyllis Gorfain <
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Date:           Thursday, 07 Apr 2005 07:33:43 -0400
Subject: 16.0625 Who Calls Kate Angry?
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0625 Who Calls Kate Angry?

David Crosby writes about reassigning the speaker who motivates
Katharina's reply in III.2:
(Bevington's ed.):

        I will be angry. What hast thou to do?
        Father, be quiet. He shall stay my leisure.

David likes the idea of Baptista rather than Petruchio, as the prior
speaker but wonders what we think and for further information about the
speech prefixes here.

I would like urge that we not change speech prefixes just because we
think the result seems more logical; moreover, if speech prefixes are
possibly confused in the prior scene doesn't warrant assuming they are
so in this one, one precedent Crosby thinks might authorize a change in 3.2.

However, if we retain the F speech-prefixes, we might find fascinating
choices we wouldn't have to imagine if we change the scripts.  With the
F speech prefixes, Kate's first line can be addressed to Petruchio, who
has just admonished her, but then, for the next line, she could turn to
her father, to spread her self-licensed anger further, and now cuts him
off -- indicating he may have just opened his mouth and she is quickly
silencing him.  In this way, she rebukes one man and silences the other,
perhaps pivoting to do so.  The original speech prefixes often open up
such imaginative choices for directors and actors, and I am sure there
would be other solutions, on stage.

Phyllis Gorfain
Oberlin College
phyllis.gorfain@oberlin.college

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           James McClure <
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Date:           Wednesday, 6 Apr 2005 20:33:59 -0500
Subject: 16.0639 Who Calls Kate Angry?
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0639 Who Calls Kate Angry?

Of course, if we are to accept the use of Rolls or Cue Scripts from
another current discussion, this becomes an even more effective comedic
moment.  Baptista, having not spoken for a couple of minutes, is minding
his own business, possibly on the far side of the stage when Kate sends
the first part of her line to Petruchio. Kate then sends the second part
of her line as a preemptive strike to Baptista, who was completely
silent.  If the audience dictates, B. can even interact to the
audience's reaction to Kate's attack from nowhere.

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