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Home :: Archive :: 2005 :: April ::
How to Play Henry V act 1 scene 2
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0765  Friday, 22 April 2005

[1]     From:   HR Greenberg <
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        Date:   Thursday, 21 Apr 2005 11:41:44 EDT
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0752 How to Play Henry V act 1 scene 2

[2]     From:   Tony Burton <
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        Date:   Thursday, 21 Apr 2005 11:51:51 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0752 How to Play Henry V act 1 scene 2


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           HR Greenberg <
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Date:           Thursday, 21 Apr 2005 11:41:44 EDT
Subject: 16.0752 How to Play Henry V act 1 scene 2
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0752 How to Play Henry V act 1 scene 2

The divergent interpretations of Canterbury's intentions and psyche
given by various scholars in this group are both intriguing and
valuable.  I take the Salique speech, and indeed the entire scene, as
very open text, reflecting inter alia the widely divergent views of
Henry himself as hero and/or hypocrite, and Canterbury as either a
Polonius like fool, or a wily if tendentious litigator in the cause of
his Church and his Monarch. Thanks for the help.

HR Greenberg

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Tony Burton <
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Date:           Thursday, 21 Apr 2005 11:51:51 -0400
Subject: 16.0752 How to Play Henry V act 1 scene 2
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0752 How to Play Henry V act 1 scene 2

Michael B. Luskin makes the intelligent observation "it seems to me that
the speech is cynical and self serving, but is deadly serious."

Has anyone else noticed a resemblance between the discussion of Salic
law and the recent legal advisories to our president as to what degrees
of discomfort, duress, pain, and lasting injury are somehow not quite
"torture" as prohibited by the Geneva Convention?

Shakespeare is regularly re-"discovered" to be surprisingly and potently
subversive to persons and institutions besotted with their own
importance, virtue, and grasp of universal truths (that, uniformly,
serve to confirm them in their importance and virtue).  Maybe so many
people have trouble understanding this scene (and so many others)
because they don't want to see the ugly reflection in the mirror
Shakespeare holds up to one's gaze.

Or perhaps there's another way to look at it.

Tony Burton

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