2005

Henry V, Hamlet, and Kingdom of Heaven

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0890  Friday, 6 May 2005

From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 6 May 2005 09:18:01 -0400
Subject:        Henry V, Hamlet, and Kingdom of Heaven

An Epic Bloodletting Empowered by Faith
By MANOHLA DARGIS

Published: May 6, 2005 NY Times

"In this context, Balian initially comes across as a kind of ecumenical
Hamlet, pondering not death but belief, and then, when forced to protect
Jerusalem against Muslim troops, a proto Henry V who rallies the
faithful with yet another iteration of the St. Crispin Day's speech."

http://movies2.nytimes.com/2005/05/06/movies/06king.html?8dpc

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S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
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Shakespeare in the Comics

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0889  Friday, 6 May 2005

From:           Ray Lischner <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 06 May 2005 08:46:52 -0400
Subject:        Shakespeare in the Comics

Mother Goose and Grimm on May 6, 2005:

http://www.grimmy.com/comics.php

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Shakespeare's Biblical References

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0887  Friday, 6 May 2005

From:           Bill Arnold <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 5 May 2005 16:45:01 -0700 (PDT)
Subject:        Shakespeare's Biblical References

With Hardy's indulgence, I wish to start a thread on Shakespeare's
Biblical references.  I will begin by stating the obvious, Shakespearean
scholar Naseeb Shaheen has presented us with his tome *Biblical
References in Shakespeare's Plays* on the subject stating, in his first
sentence of his introduction, "This study of Shakespeare's biblical
references differs from previous ones in that it considers Shakespeare's
references in light of his literary sources." He footnotes this
sentence, thusly, "The most important study of Shakespeare's use of the
Bible thus far has been Richmond Noble's *Shakespeare's Biblical
Knowledge and Use of the Book of Common Prayer,* published in 1935."

I have broadened the subject to include all of Will Shakespeare's works.

I would recommend Shaheen's introduction as a good starting point for
those who are not aware of Shakespeare's indebtedness to the Bible.
Shaheen separates out from formerly accepted literary allusions to the
Bible those he finds that Shakespeare borrowed from another source, such
as, to quote him, "Plutarch, Holinshed, Cinthio, or Boccaccio."

In general, Shakespeare appears to have borrowed equally from the Old
Testament and the New.  Shaheen cites chapter and verse from the Bible,
and act, chapter and lines from Shakespeare's plays.  Shaheen's
introduction is commendable on the history of the Bible in England just
prior to the time of Shakespeare and during.  In my opinion, he leaves
no doubt that Will Shakespeare *intended* his works to rest upon the
teachings of the Bible, and that his works therefore can be best viewed
in this context.  His 2002 book, with editorial revisions, contains this
portion of his bio, "He is now Professor of English Literature...As a
result of his research into Shakespeare's biblical references, he owns
one of the world's largest collections of early English bibles that
includes more than one hundred copies of the Geneva Bible in addition to
numerous editions of other pre-King James Bibles."

Bill Arnold
http://www.cwru.edu/affil/edis/scholars/arnold.htm

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Macbeth in Popular Rock Culture

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0888  Friday, 6 May 2005

From:           Amy Ulen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 5 May 2005 19:34:53 -0700
Subject:        Macbeth in Popular Rock Culture

I'm really excited about a recent gift I received-Lana Lane's newest CD,
_Lady Macbeth_!  This is "a heavy symphonic rock concept album based on
the famous Macbeth play by vanguard English poet, William Shakespeare.
The album tells the Macbeth story from the perspective of the famously
sinister Lady Macbeth, one of literature's darkest female figures. The
Lana Lane interpretation is at the same time sympathetic and ominous,
full of emotion and passion."  To read the entire press release, visit
http://www.thetank.com/lllmb.htm.

This album is not a simple re-telling of the plot, but it does give us
an insight into Lady Macbeth's reactions to the events.  I particularly
enjoy "Summon the Devil," a song that deals with the various murders.
It is also the only song that directly incorporates Shakespeare's text
in the chorus:

Double double toil and trouble
Fire burn and caldron bubble
By the pricking of my thumbs
Something wicked this way comes

This is a great album if you like hard or progressive rock.  If you are
into heavy metal, I highly recommend Jag Panzer's _Thane to the Throne_!
  This is a full re-telling of _Macbeth_.  Visit their website at
http://www.jagpanzer.com/ to learn more.  You can also listen to brief
selections of the songs at
http://www.cduniverse.com/search/xx/music/pid/1231242/a/Thane+To+The+Throne.
  htm.

Lana Lane also has an incredible song titled "Romeo and Juliet" on her
album _Project Shangri-La_.  If you get that album, make sure you are
ordering the right import because the song is a bonus track.

Amy Ulen
http://www.shakespearehigh.com/

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Gambon as Falstaff

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0886  Friday, 6 May 2005

From:           Richard Burt <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 5 May 2005 14:17:08 -0400
Subject:        Gambon as Falstaff

Gambon takes 'role he was born to play' as glorious clown Falstaff
By Louise Jury, Arts Correspondent
Published : 05 May 2005
http://enjoyment.independent.co.uk/theatre/news/story.jsp?story=635694

Sir Michael Gambon is making his long-awaited theatrical debut as Sir
John Falstaff, Shakespeare's most glorious clown and wit.

Ralph Fiennes and Simon Russell Beale may have sold out Julius Caesar at
the Barbican before it even opened, and Derek Jacobi's Don Carlos may
well betipped for a Broadway transfer, but London's theatre critics have
been keenly anticipating the application of Gambon's undisputed talent
to the role of Prince Hal's disreputable sidekick in Henry IV.

[ . . . ]

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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