2005

CFP: Foreign Shakespeare in the Post-Colonial World

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0950  Friday, 20 May 2005

From:           Cary DiPietro <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 20 May 2005 10:51:08 +0900
Subject:        CFP: Foreign Shakespeare in the Post-Colonial World

For those planning to attend the International Shakespeare Association's
Eighth World Congress in Brisbane in 2006, below is a call for papers
for a seminar I'll be leading with Atsuhiko Hirota (with apologies for
cross-posting).  The deadline for registration is July 15 2005.  Please
feel free to email me offlist if you have any questions or wish to read
the longer seminar description.  Further information about the
conference programme and registration is available on the Congress website:
www.shakespeare2006.net

Further information about the ISA and seminar abstracts are available on
the ISA website at:
http://www.shakespeare.org.uk/main/7/389

*Foreign Shakespeare in the Post-Colonial World*

Seminar Leaders: Atsuhiko Hirota (Kyoto University, Japan) and Cary
DiPietro (Kyoto University, Japan)

This seminar will address the concept of 'foreignness' as an
interpretive strategy in the global cultures in which Shakespeare is
read and performed. Participants are invited to explore a wide array of
interpretive modes, including textual readings, theoretical approaches,
and performance contexts. While 'foreignness' is here defined broadly,
papers may examine the issue of language; for example, interpretations
which emerge out of engagements with Shakespeare as the drama of a
foreign language, or which engage with the foreignness of Shakespeare's
language. Papers may also consider post-colonial perspectives aiming to
provide new global contexts for Shakespeare.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Traffic

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0949  Thursday, 19 May 2005

From:           Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, May 19, 2005
Subject:        Traffic

I don't know about the rest of the list; but as the person who prepares
the digests for distribution, it surely seems to me that far more
conversations are going on at one time that are necessary.

It would simplify my life if several of the current threads could come
to an end.

Thanks for your consideration,
Hardy

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Webpage <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Failed Application

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0947  Thursday, 19 May 2005

From:           Cheryl Newton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 18 May 2005 14:41:42 -0400
Subject: 16.0935 Failed Application
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0935 Failed Application

Briefly for Bill:  The KJV translation is rife with mistranslations,
some for lack of scholarship, some in the OT deliberate to "predict" the
events of the NT.  The Jewish Publication Society has a recent
translation of the (OT) Hebrew Bible which is both readable and
eye-opening.  It's interesting for example to compare JPS translation of
the Sea of Reeds with the KJV account of the parting of the Red Sea.  Of
course, in Shakespeare's day, it's unlikely any Christian had the
vaguest idea that the KJV was not "The" Bible.  There are internet sites
for those even today holding that view to congregate & denounce any
newer translation as works of the Devil.

Cheryl

_______________________________________________________________
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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Basch Threads

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0948  Thursday, 19 May 2005

[1]     From:   Bill Arnold <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 18 May 2005 08:45:01 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0937 Basch Threads

[2]     From:   Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 18 May 2005 18:20:14 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0937 Basch Threads

[3]     From:   Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 18 May 2005 16:01:21 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0937 Basch Threads


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bill Arnold <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 18 May 2005 08:45:01 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 16.0937 Basch Threads
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0937 Basch Threads

Michael B. Luskin writes, "I recently read Caroline Spurgeon's book on
Shakespeare's imagery. She points out that...Shakespeare's rather meager
use of Biblical allusion was confined to the most well known stories and
people.  I can't remember for certain, but I think she said that he
draws equally on the old and new testaments...What is a Biblical
reference? We have to be careful in what we consider a genuine Biblical
quote or reference or only a parallel idea."

Hi, Michael.  I would suggest you read the companion thread I developed
and which is running under the subject heading Shakespeare's Biblical
References.  It seems evident from the works I cited that Shakespeare
did borrow equally from Old and New Testament.  And Shakespearean
scholar Shaheen demonstrates that your assumption is correct, because he
isolates genuine Biblical quotes from borrowings from other works, even
citing the works of Holinshed and Boccaccio as examples of the latter
which Shakespeare is known to have alluded to.

As to Basch's claims I have no comment other than to say that there
should be a distinction drawn in your mind, and SHAKSPERean minds, that
to quote from the Bible, both the Old and New Testaments, is different
than saying that someone was a Talmudic scholar and quoted only from the
Talmud, and ipso facto would lead to conclusions other than that Will
Shakespeare was a son of the Judaic-Christian culture of England, circa
1600.

Bill Arnold
http://www.cwru.edu/affil/edis/scholars/arnold.htm

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 18 May 2005 18:20:14 +0100
Subject: 16.0937 Basch Threads
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0937 Basch Threads

Michael B. Luskin wrote

 >Basch is doing pilpul.  But he is smarter than I am,
 >a better writer than most of us, and a more decent,
 >tolerant, and patient person than almost all of us.

Really? What if he's the same David Basch who wrote the following:

"The Arabs, products of their culture, do not have the temperamental
capacity to willingly give Israel peace any more than the jackal can
abandon his blood lust for the sheep."
(http://www.freeman.org/m_online/nov97/basch1.htm)

I'd say the writer of this is a racist. (And one with a hallow knowledge
of the rhetoric of historical anti-semitism, which of course his own
words eerily parrot.)

Those wishing to see how Basch's weak grasp of Shakespeare gets used in
his racist writings should see his unintentionally funny account of
Hamlet (= the Israeli Labor Party) deciding not to kill Claudius (= the
PLO in Tunisia). It's at:

http://www.freeman.org/m_online/jun98/basch.htm

The humour, I should add, is in Basch's limited dramatic sense; the
bigotry and hatred are all too clearly serious.

Gabriel Egan

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 18 May 2005 16:01:21 -0400
Subject: 16.0937 Basch Threads
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0937 Basch Threads

 >I was fascinated by the person who, among other things, wrote that the
 >Song of Songs demonstrates the love between God and his church.  He's
 >nuttier than Basch, if he was serious.

Of course I was being facetious.  I expected that every educated member
of the List would immediately grasp the allusion to the headnotes in KJV
without the need for an explanatory gloss.  Alas!

While Mr. Luskin's point that a statistical analysis would further
demonstrate the absurdity of Basch's thesis is welcome, I am afraid it
would fall on as barren ground as my ridicule has.  What's more, it
might tend to dignify his argument by addressing it on Basch's own
basis.  Surely, we don't want to get involved in a mathematical analysis
of the syllables in the Canon.  It is enough that external evidence and
the absence of supporting evidence make the fundamental notion
ridiculous.  The proper response to a ridiculous argument is ridicule.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Gambon as Falstaff

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.0946  Thursday, 19 May 2005

[1]     From:   John Briggs <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 18 May 2005 18:46:09 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0933 Gambon as Falstaff

[2]     From:   Martin Steward <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 18 May 2005 19:17:08 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0933 Gambon as Falstaff

[3]     From:   Stephen C. Rose <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 18 May 2005 14:15:24 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.0933 Gambon as Falstaff


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John Briggs <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 18 May 2005 18:46:09 +0100
Subject: 16.0933 Gambon as Falstaff
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0933 Gambon as Falstaff

Sandra Sparks wrote:

 >Falstaff is a great role for a special few. After all, when Kemp
 >pulled his diva act on WS and was separated from the company, there
 >was no one at the time to take his place. That's why Falstaff died
 >offstage in Henry V - he couldn't be written in, as promised.

No.  Falstaff is not a clown's role, and it is not now thought that Kemp
played him.  Giorgio Melchiori proposes that John Heminges played
Falstaff, and that Kemp was the original Bardolph.  I wouldn't rule out
Shakespeare himself playing Falstaff (whether or not he was modelled on
Shakespeare's father.)  "Merry Wives" was probably after "Henry V", but
in any case, Sir Toby Belch is another Falstaff.

Incidentally, I read Weinstein's post without noticing the signature,
but when I came to the last line I thought, "I wonder..."!

John Briggs

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Martin Steward <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 18 May 2005 19:17:08 +0100
Subject: 16.0933 Gambon as Falstaff
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0933 Gambon as Falstaff

I was at the opening night of 1HIV and saw 2HIV a couple of days later.

Gambon's impersonation of a drunkard got in the way of his diction
pretty seriously, to the extent that one could only understand about 60%
of what Falstaff was saying. Although he pulled off most of the comedy
fairly well, there was no sense of the character's pathos in 1HIV and
only a little more in 2HIV.

1HIV was saved by a brilliant performance from David Harewood as
Hotspur. A perfect balance of tough martial nobility and childish
petulance, he revealed the extent to which the character is a
proto-Coriolanus more strikingly than I have seen before. In 2HIV
excellent comedy was had thanks to effective buffoonery from John Wood
as Shallow and Alistair Petrie as Pistol.

David Bradley offered his usual insufferable monotone arhythmic droning
in the eponymous role.

The music, by Max & Ben Ringham and Andrew Rutland, was quite good.

m

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Stephen C. Rose <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 18 May 2005 14:15:24 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 16.0933 Gambon as Falstaff
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.0933 Gambon as Falstaff

Sorry: Nietzshe = Nietzsche -- an unforgivable typo. Of course, if he
had lived during Shakespeare's time.

Best, S

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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