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Home :: Archive :: 2005 :: November ::
Shakespeare's Body
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1835  Tuesday, 8 November 2005

[1] 	From: 	Edmund Taft <
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	Date: 	Friday, 04 Nov 2005 09:29:29 -0500
	Subj: 	Shakespeare's Body

[2] 	From: 	Richard Kennedy <
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	Date: 	Friday, 4 Nov 2005 07:36:59 -0800
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 16.1816 Shakespeare's Body

[3] 	From: 	Larry Weiss <
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	Date: 	Friday, 04 Nov 2005 12:18:54 -0500
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 16.1824 Shakespeare's Body

[4] 	From: 	Sarah Cohen <
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	Date: 	Friday, 04 Nov 2005 12:11:18 -0800
	Subj: 	RE: SHK 16.1824 Shakespeare's Body


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Edmund Taft <
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Date: 		Friday, 04 Nov 2005 09:29:29 -0500
Subject: 	Shakespeare's Body

Of the suggestion that Dr. John Hall murdered his father-in-law, 
Shakespeare, Stanley Wells writes, ""John Hall was a very highly 
respected physician. He was a churchgoing Protestant and pillar of the 
Church. The idea he may have murdered anybody is slanderous to him."

A recent biographer of Shakespeare seems to think that John Hall and 
Shakespeare were good friends, often seen together when they made trips 
to London in Shakespeare's later years.

He also suggests that Shakespeare probably was quite proud to have such 
a well-respected and diligent professional for a son-in-law.

What in heaven's name is the evidence that Hall bumped off his 
father-in-law?

Ed Taft

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Richard Kennedy <
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Date: 		Friday, 4 Nov 2005 07:36:59 -0800
Subject: 16.1816 Shakespeare's Body
Comment: 	Re: SHK 16.1816 Shakespeare's Body

Washington Irving visited Stratford, ca. 1820, and published in "The 
Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent", this sojourn to Stratford-on-Avon.

http://whitewolf.newcastle.edu.au/words/authors/I/IrvingWashington/prose/geoffreycrayon/index.html

In part, he had this to say of Shakespeare's grave and remains.

Just over the grave, in a niche of the wall, is a bust of Shakespeare, 
put up shortly after his death and considered as a resemblance. The 
aspect is pleasant and serene, with a finely-arched forehead; and I 
thought I could read in it clear indications of that cheerful, social 
disposition by which he was as much characterized among his 
contemporaries as by the vastness of his genius. The inscription 
mentions his age at the time of his decease, fifty-three years-an 
untimely death for the world, for what fruit might not have been 
expected from the golden autumn of such a mind, sheltered as it was from 
the stormy vicissitudes of life, and flourishing in the sunshine of 
popular and royal favor?

The inscription on the tombstone has not been without its effect. It has 
prevented the removal of his remains from the bosom of his native place 
to Westminster Abbey, which was at one time contemplated. A few years 
since also, as some laborers were digging to make an adjoining vault, 
the earth caved in, so as to leave a vacant space almost like an arch, 
through which one might have reached into his grave. No one, however, 
presumed to meddle with his remains so awfully guarded by a malediction; 
and lest any of the idle or the curious or any collector of relics 
should be tempted to commit depredations, the old sexton kept watch over 
the place for two days, until the vault was finished and the aperture 
closed again. He told me that he had made bold to look in at the hole, 
but could see neither coffin nor bones-nothing but dust. It was 
something, I thought, to have seen the dust of Shakespeare.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Larry Weiss <
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Date: 		Friday, 04 Nov 2005 12:18:54 -0500
Subject: 16.1824 Shakespeare's Body
Comment: 	Re: SHK 16.1824 Shakespeare's Body

 >The late Charles Hamilton, who is also responsible for the
 >risible hypothesis (unfortunately spreading like wildfire among
 >non-academics, and even casually accepted, I have learned, by
 >academics who have seen it in headlines, and not looked into
 >the matter) that "The Second Maiden's Tragedy" is "Cardenio".

Hamilton was way into his dotage when he came up with this one.  His 
book argues from paleographic evidence that SMT was written by the 
author of Hand D in The Book of Sir Thomas More.  However, at a 
performance of the play in Manhattan, he said that he did not base his 
thesis on handwriting similarities (which was his field of study), but, 
rather, on perceived stylistic similarities between SMT and late 
Shakespeare, he said SMT was a "romance."  If The Second Maiden's 
Tragedy is a romance, then Titus Andronicus is a pastoral.

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Sarah Cohen <
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Date: 		Friday, 04 Nov 2005 12:11:18 -0800
Subject: 16.1824 Shakespeare's Body
Comment: 	RE: SHK 16.1824 Shakespeare's Body

"Perhaps American Scientists could check tidal currents and start 
sifting all the beaches on the US eastern seaboard for nano-traces of 
Bard instead?"

Or the American scientists could call the whole thing off and have a keg 
party. Who knows - they might find Shakespeare's noble dust stopping a 
bung-hole.

Sarah Cohen

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