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Home :: Archive :: 2005 :: November ::
Grafton Portrait
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1836  Tuesday, 8 November 2005

[1] 	From: 	David Basch <
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	Date: 	Friday, 04 Nov 2005 13:00:19 -0500
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 16.1823 Grafton Portrait

[2] 	From: 	Ben Alexander <
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	Date: 	Saturday, 5 Nov 2005 00:11:53 -0000
	Subj: 	Grafton Portrait


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		David Basch <
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Date: 		Friday, 04 Nov 2005 13:00:19 -0500
Subject: 16.1823 Grafton Portrait
Comment: 	Re: SHK 16.1823 Grafton Portrait

Peter Farey wrote concerning the Marlowe and Grafton portraits:

 >Interestingly, I have a copy of Downie and Parnell's (eds) "Constructing
 >Christopher Marlowe" before me, and see that the dust jacket shows both
 >the Corpus Christi and Grafton portraits as "thought to be of Marlowe".
 >The age at that date does apply equally to Marlowe, of course, and the
 >styles of the doublet and collar in the portraits are very similar. The
 >face is rather more gaunt in the Grafton one, which is fairly easily
 >explained, but I gather the eyes are of a different colour - grey rather
 >than brown or hazel - which is perhaps less so.

I too have seen photos of both paintings, the alleged "Marlowe" and the 
"Grafton." While Peter notes some differences, he does not mention the 
pouty fat lip of the Marlowe and its receding chin, which distinguishes 
it from the portrait in the Grafton. I don't think it is the same 
person. The expression is altogether different.

What is also interesting is that the conception of the pose in both is 
similar. Has anyone studied the styles of the painting up close to 
determine if it was the same painter? If the Grafton was not by the same 
painter, the two seem to be of the same school. It would also suggest, 
assuming the Grafton was a portrait of Shakespeare, that the two men had 
some personal connection.

David Basch

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Ben Alexander <
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Date: 		Saturday, 5 Nov 2005 00:11:53 -0000
Subject: 	Grafton Portrait

Dear SHAKSPERians,

On the subject of portraits, although the National Portrait Gallery has 
rejected the
Grafton, it does have some semblence to the Sanders. The Sanders looks 
remarkably like the
Folger's William Herbert, same colour reddish-brown hair, blue eyes and 
birthmark on left
forehead. Has anybody got a good picture of the Grafton that clearly 
shows the colour of
hair & eyes?

Likewise has anyone got a good picture of the Corpus Christie Marlowe? I 
would like to
confirm, or otherwise, that the buttons are covered with what look like 
porcupines. In
which case there would be a Sidney connections.

For the record, I have been in correspondence with the NPG over the last 
twelve months
about the Droueshout and the Sanders portraits. Without entering into 
the authorship
question, it is possible that if a portrait of Shakespeare was never 
actually available,
that the Droeshout is of William Herbert, the Dedicatee?

Regards,
Ben Alexander

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