2005

Romance Question

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1852  Thursday, 10 November 2005

[1] 	From: 	Tom Bishop <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Wednesday, 9 Nov 2005 10:41:33 -0500
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 16.1839 Romance Question

[2] 	From: 	Siobhan Cox <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Thursday, 10 Nov 2005 11:28:23 +0000 (GMT)
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 16.1839 Romance Question

[3] 	From: 	Steven Mentz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Thursday, 10 Nov 2005 08:50:56 -0500
	Subj: 	RE: romances


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Tom Bishop <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Wednesday, 9 Nov 2005 10:41:33 -0500
Subject: 16.1839 Romance Question
Comment: 	Re: SHK 16.1839 Romance Question

Older but still good are:

Louis B. Wright, Middle-Class culture in Elizabethan England (1935)
E.C. Pettet, Shakespeare and the Romance Tradition (1949)
Carol Gesner, Shakespeare and the Greek Romance (1970)
Howard Felperin, Shakespearean Romance (1972)
Patricia Parker, Inescapable Romance (1979)

More recent:
Simon Palfrey, Late Shakespeare (1997)
Lori Newcomb, Reading Popular romance in early modern England (2002)

Much recent work on romance seems to me to have been scattered among 
other topics: colonization, gender issues, politics, etc. in ways that 
make it difficult to point to central texts. For instance Michael 
Neill's recent Putting History to the Question (2000) asks about romance 
and colonialism in a couple of its essays. Velma Richamond asked about 
Shakespeare, Catholicism and Romance in another recent book of that 
title (2002).

These just off the top of my head. I'm sure there are others I'm missing.

Tom

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Siobhan Cox <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Thursday, 10 Nov 2005 11:28:23 +0000 (GMT)
Subject: 16.1839 Romance Question
Comment: 	Re: SHK 16.1839 Romance Question

Helen Cooper's "The English Romance in Time: Transforming Motifs from 
Geoffrey of Monmouth to the Death of Shakespeare" (Aberdeen University 
Press, 2004) might be useful to you.  I can't remember if she mentions 
either of your primary sources specifically, but it would be worthwhile 
to read it for the general discussion of romance.

Siobhan Cox

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Steven Mentz <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Thursday, 10 Nov 2005 08:50:56 -0500
Subject: 	RE: romances

Some recent work on early modern English prose romance: Lori Newcomb's 
*Reading the Romance in Early Modern England*; an edited collection and 
two books by Constance Relihan (*Fashioning Authority: The Development 
of Elizabethan Novelistic Discourse*, *Cosmographical Glasses*, and 
*Framing Elizabethan Fictions*); Derek Alwes's *Sons and Authors in 
Elizabethan Fiction* (which responds to Richard Helgerson's old but good 
*The Elizabethan Prodigals*); and Donald Beecher's collection, *Critical 
Approaches to Prose Fiction*.  Beecher's Barnebe Riche Society 
publications also has done several modern reprints of these texts, 
including *Rosalynde*.

Also, since self-promotion seems allowed on this list, my own *Romance 
for Sale in Early Modern England: The Rise of Prose Fiction* will be out 
from Ashgate in early 2006.  Should be there for RSA.  I spend some time 
on the problem of defining romance.

Steve Mentz

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Lear's Illegitimate Son?

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1851  Thursday, 10 November 2005

From: 		Arnie Perlstein <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Wednesday, 9 Nov 2005 16:12:20 -0500
Subject: 	Lear's Illegitimate Son?

A wild thought invaded my head last night. To wit, has it ever been 
suggested that Edmund might really have been King Lear's illegitimate 
son (sired on Gloucester's wife in a moment of regal privilege)? And 
that Gloucester either never knew it, or looked the other way? And that 
Edmund may not have known it, but felt it somehow?

It was something in the callous way that Gloucester jokes with Kent at 
the very beginning of the play that made me wonder. It would lend an 
entire layer of irony to the action of the play if it were so, in terms 
of rendering Edmund's flirtations with Goneril and Regan incestuous, and 
in terms of how Edmund is instrumental in Lear's tragic downfall.

Anyway, have any of you ever heard this wild idea previously expressed? 
  I just spent a short time trying to find out if it had ever entered 
anyone else's, and the closest I saw was an article from a while back by 
William B.  Bache, which suggested that Albany might have been Lear's 
illegitimate son.

Arnie Perlstein
Weston, Florida

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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

CFP: Shakespeare and the Queen's Men

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1849  Thursday, 10 November 2005

From: 		Holger Schott Syme <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Thursday, 10 Nov 2005 00:35:22 -0500
Subject: 	CFP: Shakespeare and the Queen's Men (Toronto, Oct 2006)

CALL FOR PAPERS
SHAKESPEARE AND THE QUEEN'S MEN CONFERENCE
Toronto, 27-29 Oct 2006 -- Abstracts deadline: February 15, 2006

This major international conference at the University of Toronto is 
being organized by the SSHRC-funded "Shakespeare and the Queen's Men" 
project in association with Poculi Ludique Societas (PLS). The project, 
a joint venture led by Alexandra Johnston (REED, University of Toronto) 
and Helen Ostovich (McMaster University), aims to recreate the staging 
conditions of a sixteenth-century touring company in order to study and 
test scholarly theories about acting styles and repertory through 
performance practice.

The conference will feature keynote addresses followed by thematically 
organized seminars on the Queen's Men and their theatrical 
contemporaries, including questions of repertory, acting styles, and 
touring, as well as ensemble and casting issues. Participants will have 
a rare opportunity to see three Queen's Men plays (King Leir, Three 
Ladies of London, and The Famous Victories of Henry the Fifth) in 
different venues in Toronto and Hamilton reflecting the range of playing 
spaces available to touring companies. We invite papers dealing with 
theatrical practice in the plays of the Queen's Men and other companies 
of the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries or addressing 
theatre-historical questions pertaining to the works of Shakespeare, his 
contemporaries and collaborators, and their borrowings from or 
transformations of theatrical material of the 1580s and 90s. Related 
concerns might include the social history of playing, the history of 
censorship, provincial and metropolitan conditions of performance, or 
early dramaturgy, including but not limited to questions of staging, 
clowning, extemporization, jigs, etc. Submissions from graduate students 
and theatre practitioners doing work in these fields would be 
particularly welcome.

Proposals of 250 words for papers (maximum length 3000 words) should be 
submitted by February 15, 2006 to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. (no attachments 
please). For more information on the "Shakespeare and the Queen's Men" 
project, consult 
http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/~reed/QueensMen/conference.html.

Chris Hicklin, Jeremy Lopez, Helen Ostovich, and Holger Syme
Program Committee

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Medieval and Renaissance Conference South Africa 2006

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1850  Thursday, 10 November 2005

From: 		Victor Houliston <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Thursday, 10 Nov 2005 10:14:03 +0200
Subject: 	Medieval and Renaissance Conference South Africa 2006

Conference Announcement and Call for Papers for SASMARS 2006:
"KNOWLEDGE/POWER"

We are pleased to announce that the 18th Biennial Conference of the 
Southern Africa Society of Medieval and Renaissance Studies will be held 
at Mont Fleur, Stellenbosch, South Africa, on 6-9 September 2006.

The theme of the Conference is "Knowledge/Power". In an effort to 
facilitate a wide-ranging, interdisciplinary conversation, we encourage 
scholars working in any discipline to submit abstracts addressing this 
theme: especially, the relationship between knowledge production and its 
material, discursive and political contexts. In particular, we hope that 
participants will address the complex and unstable processes whereby 
knowledge transmits and (re)produces power, but also undermines and 
subverts it.

A selection of the papers presented at the conference will be published 
in a special issue of The Southern African Journal of Medieval and 
Renaissance Studies.

Suggested topics include, but are by no means limited to:

Scientific revolutions;
Social, economic, religious and academic power;
Discursive formations and institutionality;
Technology and social change;
Mercantilism, colonialism and Empire;
Reason and society;
History of the book;
Medieval and Renaissance political institutions;
Dominance/subversion paradigms;
Theories of power;
Power and subjectivity;
Gendered constructions of the self;
Race in Medieval and Renaissance studies;
Power and subaltern discourses;
Power, knowledge and representation;
Foucaldian approaches in Medieval and Renaissance studies;
Medieval and Renaissance studies in the postcolonial academy.

KEYNOTE SPEAKER:

Jerry Brotton, Queen Mary College, University of London, author of The 
Renaissance Bazaar: From the Silk Road to Michelangelo (OUP, 2004) and 
other significant works on Renaissance culture. He is currently working 
on a book on the formation and dispersal of the art collection of King 
Charles I.

Please send proposals (250-300 words) for 20-minute papers to the 
convener, Victor Houliston, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by 31 
January 2006.

Department of English
University of the Witwatersrand
2050 Johannesburg
South Africa

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Call for Papers

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1848  Thursday, 10 November 2005

From: 		Jos


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