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Home :: Archive :: 2005 :: October ::
Italian Translations of Shakespeare
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1694  Tuesday, 4 October 2005

[1] 	From: 	Alan Jones <
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	Date: 	Saturday, 1 Oct 2005 15:07:17 +0100
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 16.1676 Italian Translations of Shakespeare

[2] 	From: 	Peter Bridgman <
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	Date: 	Saturday, 1 Oct 2005 16:33:00 +0100
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 16.1676 Italian Translations of Shakespeare

[3] 	From: 	Stuart Manger <
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	Date: 	Saturday, 1 Oct 2005 16:35:41 +0100
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 16.1676 Italian Translations of Shakespeare

[4] 	From: 	Kathy Dent <
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	Date: 	Sunday, 02 Oct 2005 00:50:39 +0100
	Subj: 	RE: SHK 16.1676 Italian Translations of Shakespeare

[5] 	From: 	Jack Kamen <
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	Date: 	Sunday, 2 Oct 2005 09:25:53 -0500
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 16.1676 Italian Translations of Shakespeare

[6] 	From: 	David Evett <
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	Date: 	Sunday, 2 Oct 2005 15:44:37 -0400
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 16.1676 Marmite


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Alan Jones <
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Date: 		Saturday, 1 Oct 2005 15:07:17 +0100
Subject: 16.1676 Italian Translations of Shakespeare
Comment: 	Re: SHK 16.1676 Italian Translations of Shakespeare

Marmite (MARmight) is a dark-brown salty goo made from (chiefly) yeast 
extract and spices. It is spread very thinly indeed (scraped, really) on 
buttered toast, as a snack. One can also use it to flavour stews and 
suchlike. It has an Australian cousin, Vegemite, which to me tastes very 
similar. Both are revolting unless used very sparingly, but much enjoyed 
by many in the UK and the former colonies.

Alan Jones

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Peter Bridgman <
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Date: 		Saturday, 1 Oct 2005 16:33:00 +0100
Subject: 16.1676 Italian Translations of Shakespeare
Comment: 	Re: SHK 16.1676 Italian Translations of Shakespeare

Norman Hinton asks ...

 >what is Marmite?

A vegetarian savoury spread made from yeast extract and salt.  If it 
wasn't for the high salt content (4.3% sodium) it would be incredibly 
healthy as the protein content is 38.4%.

What does it taste like?  We once had some friends over from New York 
who said it tasted like they "put a finger up their ass and licked it". 
  We did wonder how they might know (but then they were from NYC).

Peter Bridgman

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Stuart Manger <
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Date: 		Saturday, 1 Oct 2005 16:35:41 +0100
Subject: 16.1676 Italian Translations of Shakespeare
Comment: 	Re: SHK 16.1676 Italian Translations of Shakespeare

'Mar-might' is a concentrated beef extract. Deep black brown and 
thickish consistency. On fresh white bread - very Swallows and Amazons, 
but which if spread VERY thinly under peanut butter on very hot brown 
toast is delicious, but otherwise best in gingering up salad sandwiches, 
some meats eg ham etc. In a wonderfully squat, squashed orange shape, 
deep brown almost black glass jar, and a bright yellow screw top, and 
bright yellow and green label.  Used too as gravy browning and 
flavouring in less favoured days. Having sadly sad times at the moment 
because it is pretty high is salt. Frightfully redolent of Empire.

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Kathy Dent <
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Date: 		Sunday, 02 Oct 2005 00:50:39 +0100
Subject: 16.1676 Italian Translations of Shakespeare
Comment: 	RE: SHK 16.1676 Italian Translations of Shakespeare

 >Thanks for the definition -- but now I have to ask: what is Marmite
 >And is it pronounced 'mar-might' or 'mar-meet'', and which syllable 
gets the stress ?

Pronounced mar-might.  Don't be fooled about all that ambrosia stuff. 
What the Greek gods were actually eating was Marmite.  Otherwise known 
as yeast extract, it is a smooth, brown, salty goo that comes in a 
smooth, brown, dumpy jar with a sunny yellow lid.  The Aussies have an 
inferior version known as Vegemite, but it falls sadly short of the 
perfection of Marmite.  Marmite is available in the US, but you'd have 
to find a shop that sells stuff for ex-pat Brits.  Along with teabags 
and digestive biscuits, it is one of the foods that those in exile yearn 
for.

By the way, how has the Twiglet thread strayed from its home under the 
Southwark blue plaque discussion?

And I know it's a bit late in the day, but I was sorry that Larry Weiss 
was so sniffy about other recipients of the blue plaque.  Personally, I 
was delighted to hear that Una Marson has been honoured in this way.  As 
well as being a poet in her own right, she was instrumental in creating 
a broadcast forum for Caribbean literature on the BBC.  In this way, she 
assisted the emergence of Caribbean literature, just as Philip 
Henslowe's Rose Theatre was instrumental in bringing early modern drama 
to the world.  Perhaps Larry Weiss is unaware that Nobel prize winners 
Derek Walcott and Vidia Naipaul (among many others) gained an early 
platform for their work through the BBC's Caribbean Voices radio 
programme in the early nineteen fifties; Una Marson and later 
broadcaster Henry Swanzy are to be credited for this.

Kathy Dent

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Jack Kamen <
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Date: 		Sunday, 2 Oct 2005 09:25:53 -0500
Subject: 16.1676 Italian Translations of Shakespeare
Comment: 	Re: SHK 16.1676 Italian Translations of Shakespeare

 >Thanks for the definition -- but now I have to ask: what is
 >Marmite ? I have seen the term in hundreds of British
 >thriller and detective novels, and in many modern British
 >novels, but I have never been able to figure out what it is,
 >nor have I seen it in a grocery store (I assume it is something
 >to eat),

I believe all list members should be made aware of two programs that 
offer almost instantaneous definitions and much, much more. The 
definitions may be accessed by simply placing the cursor bar on any 
word, in any document, and pressing Alt. The programs are:

GuruNet (http://www.gurunet.com) and AnswerBar , which is a free 
offshoot of gurunet.

I find these programs to be very timesaving and almost indispensable. 
Try it on 'marmite'.

Jack Kamen

[6]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		David Evett <
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Date: 		Sunday, 2 Oct 2005 15:44:37 -0400
Subject: 16.1676 Marmite
Comment: 	Re: SHK 16.1676 Marmite

Marmite is vegetable-flavored brewers yeast processed to produce a 
gelatinous goo, dark brown in color, rather salty. I don't know what its 
actual nutritional value is, but it has been advertised for decades as 
being healthful, whether added by the spoonful to the gravy or spread on 
slices of bread-a standard snack for British children and for adults 
nostalgic for the nursery. The name comes from the kind of large ceramic 
pot in which the French cook pot au feu, and implies hours, even days of 
simmering. In my experience it's always anglicized, however, to rhyme 
with "starlight." Gourmet food shops and higher end grocery stores often 
stock it-look for a little squat round jar on one of the upper shelves 
in soups or imported foods.

Stockily,
David Evett

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