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Home :: Archive :: 2005 :: October ::
Friends, Romans, Countrymen
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1719  Friday, 7 October 2005

[1] 	From: 	John Briggs <
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	Date: 	Thursday, 6 Oct 2005 15:05:55 +0100
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 16.1707 Friends, Romans, Countrymen

[2] 	From: 	Alan Jones <
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	Date: 	Thursday, 6 Oct 2005 20:01:50 +0100
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 16.1707 Friends, Romans, Countrymen


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		John Briggs <
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Date: 		Thursday, 6 Oct 2005 15:05:55 +0100
Subject: 16.1707 Friends, Romans, Countrymen
Comment: 	Re: SHK 16.1707 Friends, Romans, Countrymen

Steve Sohmer wrote:

 >Has anyone noticed that 15 March -- the Ides of March -- is the Feast
 >of Longinus, the centurion who lanced Christ on the cross, and whose
 >sight was cured of incipient blindness by the touch of His blood (in
 >the Legenda Aurea)? Cassius' full name was Gaius Cassius Longinus.
 >Think Shakespeare could have missed that?

Quite possibly, because the feast is in neither the Sarum Calendar nor 
the Book of Common Prayer.  I can't tell if it was actually in the 
Tridentine Roman Calendar.

John Briggs

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Alan Jones <
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Date: 		Thursday, 6 Oct 2005 20:01:50 +0100
Subject: 16.1707 Friends, Romans, Countrymen
Comment: 	Re: SHK 16.1707 Friends, Romans, Countrymen

Joseph Egert writes:

 >Alan Jones suggests Octavius does not willingly join Antony in
 >cynically paring down Caesar's bequests to the plebs, as "He
 >[Octavius] remains silent when Antony proposes reducing its scale..."
 >
 >I believe silence in this instance clearly implies consent, regally 
granted
 >by the new Caesar on the block, "You may do your will." Interestingly,
 >both Antony and Lepidus were JC's equine errand boys as "magister
 >equitum." They were all Caesar's creatures.

"YOU may do YOUR will" is not the same as something like "We will do 
so". It seems to me more like saying "That's your policy - don't involve 
me". Octavius Caesar is already distinguishing his ambitions and methods 
from those of Antony, who wants to take the lead in the new regime or at 
least become the power behind the throne. This finally becomes clear 
when he commandeers the body of Brutus and takes control with a crisp 
"Let's away", suggesting that they "part" rather than share "the glories 
of this happy day". The plot of "Antony and Cleopatra" is already in view.

Alan Jones

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