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Home :: Archive :: 2005 :: October ::
Sonnet 76
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1766  Tuesday, 18 October 2005

[1] 	From: 	John Briggs <
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	Date: 	Monday, 17 Oct 2005 16:46:35 +0100
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 16.1758 Sonnet 76

[2] 	From: 	Bob Grumman <
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	Date: 	Monday, 17 Oct 2005 12:31:26 -0400
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 16.1758 Sonnet 76

[3] 	From: 	John W. Kennedy <
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	Date: 	Monday, 17 Oct 2005 13:17:31 -0400
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 16.1758 Sonnet 76

[4] 	From: 	Markus Marti <
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	Date: 	Tuesday, 18 Oct 2005 09:10:48 +0200
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 16.1758 Sonnet 76

[5] 	From: 	Sam Small <
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	Date: 	Tuesday, 18 Oct 2005 17:42:08 +0100
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 16.1758 Sonnet 76


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		John Briggs <
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Date: 		Monday, 17 Oct 2005 16:46:35 +0100
Subject: 16.1758 Sonnet 76
Comment: 	Re: SHK 16.1758 Sonnet 76

Ben Alexander wrote:

 >In Sonnet 76 at line 7 we have
 >
 >"That euery word doth almost fel my name,"

Commentators are almost universally agreed that 'fel' should read 
'tell'.  I say 'almost', because the collation of Colin Burrow's Oxford 
"Complete Sonnets and Poems" (Complete Poems and Sonnets, Sonnets and 
Complete Poems?) reveals that Bernard Lintot in 1709, 1711 suggested 
'fell', and then adds: "sell conj. This edition."  As the text and 
commentary reveal no trace of this "conjecture", it is rather more 
mysterious than the crux it seeks to elucidate!

John Briggs

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Bob Grumman <
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Date: 		Monday, 17 Oct 2005 12:31:26 -0400
Subject: 16.1758 Sonnet 76
Comment: 	Re: SHK 16.1758 Sonnet 76

 >In Sonnet 76 at line 7 we have
 >
 >"That euery word doth almost fel my name,"
 >
 >[That every word doth almost tell my name,]
 >
 >I have seen a number of attempts to understand what the writer meant.
 >I have formed my own opinion based on the fact that the writer was
 >certainly not sitting at a typewriter.
 >
 >I would be grateful to read other people's opinions of what they think
 >was going though the writer's mind as quill touched paper.

His name was Wordsworth.  Hence, every "word" came near to telling his 
full last name.

--Bob G.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		John W. Kennedy <
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Date: 		Monday, 17 Oct 2005 13:17:31 -0400
Subject: 16.1758 Sonnet 76
Comment: 	Re: SHK 16.1758 Sonnet 76

 >In Sonnet 76 at line 7 we have
 >
 >"That euery word doth almost fel my name,"
 >
 >[That every word doth almost tell my name,]
 >
 >I have seen a number of attempts to understand what the writer meant.
 >I have formed my own opinion based on the fact that the writer was
 >certainly not sitting at a typewriter.
 >
 >I would be grateful to read other people's opinions of what they think
 >was going though the writer's mind as quill touched paper.

The obvious and sufficient sense is clear from the context. The poet is 
affirming that his literary style is unchanging, and that, as a 
consequence, it is readily recognized as his.

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Markus Marti <
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 >
Date: 		Tuesday, 18 Oct 2005 09:10:48 +0200
Subject: 16.1758 Sonnet 76
Comment: 	Re: SHK 16.1758 Sonnet 76

 >In Sonnet 76 at line 7 we have
 >
 >"That euery word doth almost fel my name,"
 >
 >[That every word doth almost tell my name,]
 >
 >I have seen a number of attempts to understand what the writer meant.
 >I have formed my own opinion based on the fact that the writer was
 >certainly not sitting at a typewriter.
 >
 >I would be grateful to read other people's opinions of what they think
 >was going though the writer's mind as quill touched paper.

"le style, c'est l'homme"?

The writer is fishing for compliments in this ironic sonnet. He pretends 
that his constant repetitions (so far from variation and quick change), 
the same similes, conceits etc. make his style boring. Every reader 
would immediately recognise his works as the works of a writer who has 
nothing else to say than "I love you" - a topic that is worn out, a 
"noted weed".

The sonnet should trigger the reader to reply that this poem itself 
already proves the contrary.

Cheers,
Markus Marti

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Sam Small <
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 >
Date: 		Tuesday, 18 Oct 2005 17:42:08 +0100
Subject: 16.1758 Sonnet 76
Comment: 	Re: SHK 16.1758 Sonnet 76

A fairly simple one here, I do believe.  The poet, astonishingly, is 
saying that his verse has become so bad - or clich

 

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