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Home :: Archive :: 2005 :: October ::
Clocks and Bells
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1787  Friday, 21 October 2005

[1] 	From: 	Michael Egan <
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	Date: 	Thursday, 20 Oct 2005 08:39:44 -1000
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 16.1780 Clocks and Bells

[2] 	From: 	Jack Heller <
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	Date: 	Thursday, 20 Oct 2005 13:42:39 -0500 (EST)
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 16.1780 Clocks and Bells


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Michael Egan <
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Date: 		Thursday, 20 Oct 2005 08:39:44 -1000
Subject: 16.1780 Clocks and Bells
Comment: 	Re: SHK 16.1780 Clocks and Bells

I agree with Hardy that there's little to be gained in repeatedly 
circling the same track. I'm content to let Holger Schott Syme express 
his disagreements with me in some future review of Richard II, Part One. 
I'm glad that he's willing to good-humoredly grant my major premise 
concerning Shakespeare's authorship.

As for Macbeth, my suggestion that the play might have been originally 
conceived for indoors was merely that, a suggestion. Many of the 
action's pervasive details (the darkness, the candles, the spooks, owls 
and witches, etc.) gain resonance from this hypothesis. But it's beyond 
proof.

--Michael Egan

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Jack Heller <
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Date: 		Thursday, 20 Oct 2005 13:42:39 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 16.1780 Clocks and Bells
Comment: 	Re: SHK 16.1780 Clocks and Bells

Before this thread disappears altogether, may I repeat this question, 
first posted on October 10:

In the play A Mad World, My Masters (by Thomas Middleton), Follywit has 
his theft of a watch discovered by the ringing of its alarm. As I 
supposed that timepieces were far more rudimentary in 1606, how would 
the illusion of a watch alarm have been created to have the sound occur 
on cue?

Jack Heller

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