2005

Clocks and Bells

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1718  Friday, 7 October 2005

[1] 	From: 	Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Thursday, 6 Oct 2005 12:54:22 -0400
	Subj: 	SHK 16.1706 Clocks and Bells

[2] 	From: 	David Richman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Thursday, 6 Oct 2005 13:42:43 -0400
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 16.1706 Clocks and Bells

[3] 	From: 	Martin Steward <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Friday, 7 Oct 2005 09:11:43 +0100
	Subj: 	SHK 16.1706 Clocks and Bells


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Terence Hawkes <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Thursday, 6 Oct 2005 12:54:22 -0400
Subject: Clocks and Bells
Comment: 	SHK 16.1706 Clocks and Bells

Steve Sohmer writes

'there's a good deal of  inferential evidence that clocks and bells were 
audible within the Globe'

True, and so were other sounds. The screams and general uproar from the 
nearby bear-baiting arena is an example. The degree to which these might 
be made integral to the performance of certain plays is an interesting 
question.

T. Hawkes

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		David Richman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Thursday, 6 Oct 2005 13:42:43 -0400
Subject: 16.1706 Clocks and Bells
Comment: 	Re: SHK 16.1706 Clocks and Bells

In an outdoor or partially outdoor theatre, noise must necessarily 
become part of the show--for better or worse.  In a production of "The 
Tempest," on Appledore Island, one of an archipelago off the coast of 
Portsmouth, NH, the gulls became parts of the show.  Here are the 
salient sentences from the article on this show from Alex Kafka's 
article in the Oct. 7 issue of "The Chronicle of Higher Education."

"A couple of months before, the cast might have had to carry sticks over 
their heads, as Mr. Kaye did when he was scouting locations, because the 
thousands of gulls, in full assemblage, would target the highest point 
they could find. Fewer and calmer in late August, however, they prove a 
wonderfully spontaneous, natural element in the staging. One, for 
instance, makes an emphatic cameo, its cry punctuating Prospero's 
warning to Ferdinand against breaking his newly beloved Miranda's 
"virgin-knot" before marriage."

Acting Prospero, I was and remain most grateful for this avian 
counterpoint. David Richman

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Martin Steward <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Friday, 7 Oct 2005 09:11:43 +0100
Subject: Clocks and Bells
Comment: 	SHK 16.1706 Clocks and Bells

Steve Sohmer's musings about the bells ringing outside the Globe 
presuppose a high degree of meticulousness in the planning and pacng of 
the dramatic performance, which might just about be convincing in this 
age of atomic clocks, wristwatches and train timetables... but is there 
evidence that the general population in the pre-railway age had a truly 
universal and accurate sense of time, right down to minutes and seconds 
(which is what would be required to get everyone into the Globe well in 
time to start the performance at exactly the right moment in the first 
place, and to monitor the pace of the performance so that the apposite 
moment in the playtext coincided the noise from outside?

m

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Portia's Mysterious Letter

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1717  Friday, 7 October 2005

[1] 	From: 	Arnie Perlstein <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Thursday, 6 Oct 2005 09:08:32 -0400
	Subj: 	Portia's Mysterious Letter

[2] 	From: 	John Drakakis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Thursday, 6 Oct 2005 15:57:53 +0100
	Subj: 	RE: SHK 16.1703 Portia's Mysterious Letter

[3] 	From: 	Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Thursday, 06 Oct 2005 14:09:25 -0400
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 16.1703 Portia's Mysterious Letter


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Arnie Perlstein <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Thursday, 6 Oct 2005 09:08:32 -0400
Subject: 	Portia's Mysterious Letter

First, Larry, thank you for engaging with me on my speculations:

"ME: she now disguises her gift for him as a piece of good fortune. 
LARRY: An interesting conjecture, but it does not bear analysis.  We 
must assume that Antonio was familiar with his vessels and merchandise 
and the manning of his ships.  If Antonio's actual ships were lost, how 
would Portia be able to replace them with identical bottoms, carrying 
the same cargo and manned by the same master, mate and crew?"

1. Perhaps Antonio is well aware that this is not a providential event, 
and that Portia has arranged this. By arranging things as she did, she 
allowed him to save face by playing along with that cover story. His 
saying "I am dumb" may mean, "You win, you are a magnificent 
Machiavellian. My lips are sealed"; and/or

2. Perhaps the ships were in fact never lost, but merely (as in The 
Tempest) held "in escrow" by Shylock's piratical allies, pending his 
further instructions. Then Portia, aided by the Salads, takes over "the 
helm".

"ME: I see Shylock as having authorized the "hit" on Antonio's vessels, 
but this time not to get richer, but to get revenge. So he calls in some 
pirate favors.

LARRY: This is more plausible, but the theory does not hold up if we 
consider that the ships were wracked, not pirated.  And I think WS would 
have given us a little bigger hint if Shylock were responsible."

1. What if they were not really wrecked? Who is our source for saying 
they were wrecked anyway? Isn't it one of the Salads? I forget.

2. Even if they are wrecked, see my answer, above.

"ME: It sure sounds like Salarino and Salanio knew a whole lot more than 
they were letting on"

LARRY: Perhaps they had paid a visit to Macbeth's witches, who 
controlled the winds."

C'mon, play fair! If you don't try to explain it naturalistically, then 
you're conceding my point.

And speaking of those damned witches, they were like modern day palm 
readers, they didn't have, or need, any supernatural gifts to figure out 
how Macbeth was going down.   ;)

Arnie Perlstein
Weston, Florida

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		John Drakakis <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Thursday, 6 Oct 2005 15:57:53 +0100
Subject: 16.1703 Portia's Mysterious Letter
Comment: 	RE: SHK 16.1703 Portia's Mysterious Letter

Florence Amit's analysis is all very interesting but what really does it 
have to do with Shakespeare's play?

Enquiring minds wish to know.

Cheers,
John Drakakis

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Thursday, 06 Oct 2005 14:09:25 -0400
Subject: 16.1703 Portia's Mysterious Letter
Comment: 	Re: SHK 16.1703 Portia's Mysterious Letter

 >the release of Antonio's vessels would well be within the
 >knowledge of Portia ~ (daughter of the Nasi clan) according
 >to the analogy.

I had forgotten that Portia was also a Jew.  Perhaps someone can point 
me to the passage where this is made clear.

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editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Shakespeare's "Unsatisfactory" Endings

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1715  Friday, 7 October 2005

From: 		John D. Cox <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Thursday, 6 Oct 2005 09:09:59 -0400
Subject: 16.1704 Shakespeare's "Unsatisfactory" Endings
Comment: 	RE: SHK 16.1704 Shakespeare's "Unsatisfactory" Endings

I suppose the image of Isabella blowing the Duke off is no more 
surprising for British readers than the image of Lucio knocking up 
Isabella at the convent is for American ones. Two great peoples 
separated by a common language, as Churchill observed.

Best,
John Cox
Hope College

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Epstein's LEAR

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1716  Friday, 7 October 2005

From: 		David Evett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Thursday, 6 Oct 2005 15:35:35 -0400
Subject: 16.1700 Epstein's LEAR
Comment: 	Re: SHK 16.1700 Epstein's LEAR

There are links to most of the reviews of the Actors Shakespeare Project 
*Lr* on the company website, www.actorsshakespeareproject.org, including 
several not mentioned in Geralyn Horton's post. I particularly recommend 
the one that appeared today in the Boston Phoenix, and the one in 
Variety, which convey the fullest sense of the production's tonal 
variety and richness. Also a link to the company's interactive journal, 
with blogs from various hands (including mine) and a chance to post 
comments of your own.  Those of you in reach of the production should 
know that tickets are going fast (several perfs. already sold out) but 
that the run has been extended a week, until Oct. 30.

David Evett

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

A Shrew

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1714  Friday, 7 October 2005

From: 		Peter Goldman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Thursday, 06 Oct 2005 09:27:00 -0600
Subject: 16.1698 A Shrew
Comment: 	Re: SHK 16.1698 A Shrew

See Lukas Erne in SHAKESPEARE AS LITERARY DRAMATIST who brilliant 
examines (and resolves) the problem of the so-called 'bad quartos.'

~Peter

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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