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Home :: Archive :: 2005 :: September ::
What Happens in "Hamlet"
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1443  Thursday, 1 September 2005

[1] 	From: 	Jim Blackie <
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	Date: 	Tuesday, 30 Aug 2005 11:23:15 -0400 (EDT)
	Subj: 	RE: SHK 16.1427 What Happens in

[2] 	From: 	Terence Hawkes <
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	Date: 	Thursday, 1 Sep 2005 06:04:07 -0400
	Subj: 	SHK 16.1413 What Happens in "Hamlet"


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Jim Blackie <
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Date: 		Tuesday, 30 Aug 2005 11:23:15 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 16.1427 What Happens in
Comment: 	RE: SHK 16.1427 What Happens in

Bill Arnold

 >Well then, you ought to read Bernard Grebanier's The Heart of Hamlet
 >which covers Hamlet the play and the character like a warm and fuzzy
 >bear rug. Along the way, Grebanier shows the strengths and weaknesses
 >in Wilson's thesis. I believe when you are done, you will side more
 >with Grebanier and less with Wilson on the play and character.

Sounds fascinating, but it is both out of print and (where available) 
way too expensive for me. I could not even find anything on the web 
about the author or book...

You make it sound both repulsive yet intriguing at the same time. "Warm 
and fuzzy?" Not sure I could take that. ; )

Jim Blackie

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Terence Hawkes <
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Date: 		Thursday, 1 Sep 2005 06:04:07 -0400
Subject: What Happens in "Hamlet"
Comment: 	SHK 16.1413 What Happens in "Hamlet"

It would be a shame if, in his enthusiasm for the writings of Dover 
Wilson, Jim Blackie did not see that they offer a far from neutral 
account of what happens in Hamlet or anything else.  Literary criticism 
does not take place in a political, moral or historical vacuum, nor does 
our reading of it. Wilson's essay argues a distinct political case from 
a particular political position. That in no way detracts from its 
persuasiveness. But it's as well to get a grip on what he's being 
persuasive about.

T. Hawkes

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