Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 2005 :: September ::
Kissing the Rod
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1457  Monday, 5 September 2005

[1] 	From: 	Lea Luecking Frost <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
	Date: 	Saturday, 03 Sep 2005 12:26:48 -0500
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 16.1448 Kissing the Rod

[2] 	From: 	John W. Kennedy <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
	Date: 	Saturday, 03 Sep 2005 15:11:54 -0400
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 16.1448 Kissing the Rod

[3] 	From: 	Brooke Morrill <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
	Date: 	Sunday, 04 Sep 2005 01:42:23 -0400
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 16.1448 Kissing the Rod

[4] 	From: 	David Lindley <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
	Date: 	Sunday, 4 Sep 2005 12:38:03 +0100
	Subj: 	RE: SHK 16.1448 Kissing the Rod

[5] 	From: 	Dave Johnson <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
	Date: 	Sunday, 04 Sep 2005 03:05:02 -1000
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 16.1448 Kissing the Rod


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Lea Luecking Frost <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date: 		Saturday, 03 Sep 2005 12:26:48 -0500
Subject: 16.1448 Kissing the Rod
Comment: 	Re: SHK 16.1448 Kissing the Rod

As much as references to Richard II delight me personally, I suspect 
that both Shakespeare and the writers your colleague cites are simply 
making use of the same proverbial expression. (Indeed, Shakespeare gets 
credit for a lot of phrases that are basically proverbs on the grounds 
that his use of them is particularly famous. Incidentally, this 
particular phrase also turns up in "The Two Gentlemen of Verona," which 
antedates Richard II by several years.)

Tangentially, I checked two scholarly editions of the play (scil. Ardens 
2 and 3) to see if they could shed any light on its origins (beyond 
citing Tilley's index of proverbs).  I'd had the impression that it was 
ultimately biblical but at any rate the earliest recorded use in England 
seems to be in Tyndale's Obedience of a Christian Man (published 1528).

Regards,
Lea

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		John W. Kennedy <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date: 		Saturday, 03 Sep 2005 15:11:54 -0400
Subject: 16.1448 Kissing the Rod
Comment: 	Re: SHK 16.1448 Kissing the Rod

 >A colleague of mine is at work on the rhetoric of the slavery
 >debate in the antebellum US and is particularly interested
 >in a possible connection between a phrase she keeps
 >encountering and its use in Richard II. I've pasted below
 >a query from her and will send along to her any responses
 >posted on the list.
 >
 >I think many will find her questions interesting and provocative.
 >
 >Doug Eskew
 >
 >----------------------------
 >Query from Trish Roberts-Miller:
 >
 >In 1835, various southern politicians invoke the clich

 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.