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Home :: Archive :: 2005 :: September ::
Caliban's Father
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1513  Wednesday, 14 September 2005

[1] 	From: 	David Lindley <
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 >
	Date: 	Tuesday, 13 Sep 2005 18:36:42 +0100
	Subj: 	RE: SHK 16.1504 Caliban's Father

[2] 	From: 	Larry Weiss <
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 >
	Date: 	Tuesday, 13 Sep 2005 22:15:31 -0400
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 16.1504 Caliban's Father


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		David Lindley <
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Date: 		Tuesday, 13 Sep 2005 18:36:42 +0100
Subject: 16.1504 Caliban's Father
Comment: 	RE: SHK 16.1504 Caliban's Father

Is there no rein on idle speculation and fantastic allegorisation? 
Prospero speaks of three servants, (or slaves): Trinculo, Stephano and 
Caliban.  He says (presumably to Alonso): 'Two of these fellows you / 
Must know and own; this thing of darkness, I /acknowledge mine'. 
Presumably no-one is suggesting that Alonso is father of Trinculo and 
Stephano? But Prospero's remark about his relationship with Caliban is 
exactly parallel to his apportionment of the jester and butler to the 
King of Naples.

Of course, the very different inflections that actors can choose to give 
to Prospero's words to Caliban can invest their relationship with a wide 
variety of different affects - it is a crucial moment.  But Prospero is 
saying - 'those are your servants, this is mine'.  That's all.

David Lindley

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Larry Weiss <
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 >
Date: 		Tuesday, 13 Sep 2005 22:15:31 -0400
Subject: 16.1504 Caliban's Father
Comment: 	Re: SHK 16.1504 Caliban's Father

 >Though allusions in the play to biblical elements have at
 >times been noted, no earlier commentator has recognized
 >the obvious particularist Judaic practices represented.

Isn't that extraordinary?

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