Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 2005 :: September ::
Stereotyping Hamlet..."wandering aimlessly"
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1516  Wednesday, 14 September 2005

[1] 	From: 	Cheryl Newton <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
	Date: 	Tuesday, 13 Sep 2005 16:47:56 -0400
	Subj: 	SHK 16.1507 Stereotyping Hamlet..."wandering aimlessly"

[2] 	From: 	Bill Arnold <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
	Date: 	Tuesday, 13 Sep 2005 19:32:31 -0700 (PDT)
	Subj: 	SHK 16.1507 Stereotyping Hamlet..."wandering aimlessly"


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Cheryl Newton <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date: 		Tuesday, 13 Sep 2005 16:47:56 -0400
Subject: 16.1507 Stereotyping Hamlet..."wandering aimlessly"
Comment: 	Re: SHK 16.1507 Stereotyping Hamlet..."wandering aimlessly"

I recall Kurt Vonnegut Jr citing Horatio as the "sane and decent man" in 
the play.  I wouldn't necessarily characterize Hamlet as not sane.... 
but he's a few buns short of a wiener roast.

Cheryl Newton

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Bill Arnold <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date: 		Tuesday, 13 Sep 2005 19:32:31 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 16.1507 Stereotyping Hamlet..."wandering aimlessly"
Comment: 	Re: SHK 16.1507 Stereotyping Hamlet..."wandering aimlessly"

Alan Pierpoint writes, "Wouldn't it be better to say that, alone
among the characters of the play, he responds with his intellect, his 
emotions, his moral sense, and even his madness, in a fully human way to 
the corruption and criminality of the rotten state of Denmark?   May I 
also assume that you mean 'wandering aimlessly' in the moral sense?  If 
so, I agree."

Interesting, philosophically.  Because, in my mind, Hamlet and the play 
epitomizes Plato's take on wisdom.  It is that the truth is sought since 
the storyline begins with the truth told by a spirit.  And what is the 
spirit?

Surely, our moral compass?  And where do we get this moral compass? 
This concept of Good to guide us?  Plato had his take on where it came 
from, and Shakespeare's play injects the concept that it is metaphysical 
in nature, a spiritual thing.  It is not of this world, not corporeal, 
as testified to by the text in which the sword cannot touch it.  As per 
the text Shakespeare rested his case upon, Hamlet pounded the swords 
into ploughshares.  Recall, when the play is done, and the theoretical 
curtain falls, it is the audience who has gotten its moral compass 
realigned.

Bill Arnold
http://www.cwru.edu/affil/edis/scholars/arnold.htm

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, 
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.