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Home :: Archive :: 2005 :: September ::
Notion of Time
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1553  Monday, 19 September 2005

[1] 	From: 	John D. Cox <
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	Date: 	Saturday, 17 Sep 2005 11:44:56 -0400
	Subj: 	Notion of Time

[2] 	From: 	James E. Berg <
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	Date: 	Saturday, 17 Sep 2005 12:19:39 -0400
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 16.1537 Notion of Time

[3] 	From: 	Thomas M. Lahey <
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 >
	Date: 	Saturday, 17 Sep 2005 22:04:12 -0700
	Subj: 	RE: SHK 16.1537 Notion of Time


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		John D. Cox <
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Date: 		Saturday, 17 Sep 2005 11:44:56 -0400
Subject: 	Notion of Time

Anyone interested in Shakespeare and time should read David Scott 
Kastan's book, *Shakespeare and the Shapes of Time*.

John Cox
Hope College

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		James E. Berg <
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Date: 		Saturday, 17 Sep 2005 12:19:39 -0400
Subject: 16.1537 Notion of Time
Comment: 	Re: SHK 16.1537 Notion of Time

I vote for _Romeo and Juliet, which, I think, compresses time--all 
time--into the period of Romeo and Juliet's love, and the period of love 
in to "two hours' traffick," and the "two hours' traffick" into the 
opening sonnet.  Doomsday, the end of time, begins, as Romeo says, with 
the "prince's doom."  Similarly, you might consider the closing sonnet 
of Henry V, with that wonderful phrase "small time," which has an 
evocatively ambiguous antecedent.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Thomas M. Lahey <
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Date: 		Saturday, 17 Sep 2005 22:04:12 -0700
Subject: 16.1537 Notion of Time
Comment: 	RE: SHK 16.1537 Notion of Time

 >From Joe Egert>To Edna Z. Boris in her hunt for the best Shakespeare

 >play on the notion of time, why not check out MACBETH?

Macbeth & time.  There's two instances of 'clock' in Macbeth:

II.1.  It's now past midnight as Banquo & his son Fleance ("I have not 
heard the clock.") discuss the dark night.

Macbeth killed Duncan in 1040.  The earliest clocks: 14th century!  The 
first of two clock anachronisms.  Thank you Jim Canavan, St. Rita H.S., 
Chicago, Class of 1951.  Jim was prompted to find this "flaw" in Macbeth 
at the urging of Father Albert Durant, OSA, teacher of senior English, 
who had his classes graph Macbeth.  See www.graphopus.com

The other:  II.4  A man, more than seventy, can't recall a worse night. 
Ross tell him, "by the clock, 'tis day,"

Stay healthy,
Tom

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