2005

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1578  Thursday, 22 September 2005

[1] 	From: 	Norman Hinton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Tuesday, 20 Sep 2005 11:41:55 -0500
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 16.1562 Greek Drama

[2] 	From: 	M Yawney <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Tuesday, 20 Sep 2005 12:11:47 -0700 (PDT)
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 16.1562 Greek Drama


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Norman Hinton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Tuesday, 20 Sep 2005 11:41:55 -0500
Subject: 16.1562 Greek Drama
Comment: 	Re: SHK 16.1562 Greek Drama

I don't have access to the STC here at home but

George Gascoigne translated Jocasta in 1566
Thomas Watson translated Antigone, and Watson died in 1592
Alexander Neville translated Oedipus in  1593

Of course, Shakespeare's "lesse Greek" may have been rather a lot:  the 
standard work is T. W. Baldwin,  _William Shakespeare's Small Latine and 
Lesse Greek_, University of Illinois, 1944.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		M Yawney <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Tuesday, 20 Sep 2005 12:11:47 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 16.1562 Greek Drama
Comment: 	Re: SHK 16.1562 Greek Drama

Greek drama was not very well-known or well-regarded in the Renaissance. 
Seneca and the Roman comic dramatists were the models, often referred to 
in writings about drama from the English Renaissance. I cannot think of 
any reference to any Greek playwright from that period. The reverence 
toward Seneca is especially striking since he is so little read or 
performed today, in comparison to the Greeks. It is the mirror image of 
today's valuation.

It is also unlikely that Shakespeare would have known The Poetics, which 
was little known and (as far as I know) untranslated until much later.

The names of Greek mythological figures would be well-known enough that 
Shakespeare would not have to have read Euripides to know them.

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