Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 2005 :: September ::
Shakespeare goes to high school
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1619  Monday, 26 September 2005

[1] 	From: 	Richard Burt <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
	Date: 	Saturday, 24 Sep 2005 09:17:13 -0400
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 16.1594 Shakespeare goes to high school

[2] 	From: 	Michael A. Morrison <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
	Date: 	Sunday, 25 Sep 2005 23:59:33 EDT
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 16.1594 Shakespeare goes to high school

[3] 	From: 	Cheryl Newton <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
	Date: 	Monday, 26 Sep 2005 00:55:29 -0400
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 16.1594 Shakespeare goes to high school


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Richard Burt <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date: 		Saturday, 24 Sep 2005 09:17:13 -0400
Subject: 16.1594 Shakespeare goes to high school
Comment: 	Re: SHK 16.1594 Shakespeare goes to high school

You might also want to consider when Shakespeare is (first) cited in 
films and television programs about teaching as well as censorship in 
some states of teaching particular Shakespeare plays or productions. In 
the 1990s, a teacher was fired for teaching Twelfth Night.  Also, in the 
90s, Amherst (MA) high school banned a production of West Side Story. 
And you might also consider the way comic book adaptations (and Cliff 
Notes) have been used as educational materials.

Richard

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Michael A. Morrison <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date: 		Sunday, 25 Sep 2005 23:59:33 EDT
Subject: 16.1594 Shakespeare goes to high school
Comment: 	Re: SHK 16.1594 Shakespeare goes to high school

 From the May 28, 2002 Christian Science Monitor 
(http://www.csmonitor.com/2002/0528/p13s02-lecl.html):

1895: The first English literature curriculum for a New York City high 
school includes "Julius Caesar." For decades the play remains a popular 
choice for high schools because it is seen as an excellent tool for 
teaching rhetoric and speech, and has none of the sexual 
double-entendres common in many other Shakespeare plays.

Michael LoMonico is quoted in the accompanying article--recommended 
reading for anyone teaching Shakespeare at the junior high or high 
school level.

Michael A. Morrison

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Cheryl Newton <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date: 		Monday, 26 Sep 2005 00:55:29 -0400
Subject: 16.1594 Shakespeare goes to high school
Comment: 	Re: SHK 16.1594 Shakespeare goes to high school

Michael, I can't speak to the long term history in public schools.  A 
little more than 30 years ago, my class studied Julius Caesar in our 
sophomore year.  I think its language and story line were viewed as more 
accessible to young students.  Through out the 20 years that my various 
sisters slodged their way thru, JC remained the only Shakespeare taught.

I had planned to introduce Shakespeare to my homeschooled step daughter 
in 6th grade, but her mother bumped her back into public school. sigh

Cheryl Newton

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, 
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.