2005

iPod Shakespeare

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1526  Thursday, 15 September 2005

From: 		Susanne Greenhalgh <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Thursday, 15 Sep 2005 14:21:13 +0100
Subject: 	iPod Shakespeare

Today's (new-style "Berliner" size) "Guardian" newspaper (15/09/05) has 
an editorial in praise of the iPod nano, stating it's "no dumbing-down 
machine" that's good only for "pop or rap" but can be used for plays 
etc, and that some American Universities are "already supplying set 
books in iPod-ready form".  For an essay I am writing, I am after hard 
evidence, rather than second-hand anecdote, about anyone listening to 
Shakespeare on an iPod or other of the newer sound technologies. (I'd 
also like to hear about use of older ones such as PCs, walkmans, and 
even car audio equipment for the same purpose).  I'd also be interested 
to hear any users' thoughts about experiencing Shakespeare this way. 
Please reply off list to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..  And many thanks 
in advance.

Susanne Greenhalgh

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
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editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Syphilis

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1525  Thursday, 15 September 2005

From: 		Arnie Perlstein <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Wednesday, 14 Sep 2005 20:45:08 -0400
Subject: 	Theory that Shakespeare May Have Had Syphilis

Hi, I am brand new to this Shaksper listserv, and I really enjoyed 
browsing in the archives of the past few years, there have been some 
remarkable conversations here, and I am sorry I missed them.

One thread that caught my eye was from earlier this year (I believe), 
and it briefly outlined the speculation that Shakespeare may have 
suffered from syphilis late in his life.

Since many of the controversies regarding Shakespeare's life (most 
notably, the question of his "true identity") seem to have been in the 
public eye for centuries, I wondered whether the syphilis theory might 
itself have a long ancestry, or is it of modern vintage? And if it is of 
long standing, please give whatever particulars you are aware of.

Thanks!
Arnie Perlstein
Fort Lauderdale, Florida

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Weezer and Shakespeare Split Riddle

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1523  Thursday, 15 September 2005

From: 		Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Thursday, September 15, 2005
Subject: 	Weezer and Shakespeare Split Riddle

http://www.nme.com/news/weezer/20987

NME.COM - Weezer tease fans with Shakespeare split riddle

Weezer have fuelled rumours of an imminent split, admitting that they 
have "no idea" if the band will exist in a year's time.

The college rock veterans have just released a fifth album, 'Make 
Believe', but according to guitarist Brian Bell, it could be their last.

"We have no idea if we're going to be in a band next year," he said this 
week. "That's the fun of being in Weezer. That's why we put out albums 
every three years, and we have these dark periods where we don't know if 
we're even going to be a band anymore."

Rumours of the band's imminent demise began to circulate after supposed 
clues were left in the liner notes of 'Make Believe', particularly a 
passage from Shakespeare play 'The Tempest'.

It reads: "This rough magic / I here abjure, and, when I have required / 
Some heavenly music, which even now I do / To work mine end upon their 
senses that / This airy charm is for, I'll break my staff / Bury it 
certain fathoms in the Earth / And deeper than did ever plummet sound / 
I'll drown my book."

Crucially, this was the final passage from Shakespeare's final play, 
widely regarded as the playwright saying goodbye to his fans, and when 
questioned, frontman Rivers Cuomo was equally enigmatic.

He told MTV: "When we were putting the album together and finishing up 
the artwork, I didn't know what was going to happen in the future and I 
told everyone that. I told them, 'Let's commit to this year, and see 
what happens'.  And that was one of the reasons why I put that quote in 
there, because I thought it's a really nice way to say goodbye, if it is 
a goodbye."

Bell continued: "When I saw that quote, I thought the same thing. I was 
studying Shakespeare at a university during the making of 'Make 
Believe', and it did spark some concern, and I asked Rivers about it. We 
never directly say, 'So, does this mean this is our last record? What 
does this mean?' But I knew he took Shakespeare too, and maybe it struck 
a chord with him."

http://www.xfm.co.uk/Article.asp?id=117533

Say It Ain't So': Weezer To Split?

Rumours are furiously circulating throughout the college halls of 
America as Weezer fuel rumours of a split. In a recent interview, 
guitarist Brian is quoted to have revealed, they have "no idea" if the 
band will exist in a year's time.

Following a lukewarm response to their fifth album 'Make Believe', 
Weezer have fuelled rumours they may soon disband according to guitarist 
Brian Bell.

"We have no idea if we're going to be in a band next year," he is 
reported to have said this week. "That's the fun of being in Weezer. 
That's why we put out albums every three years, and we have these dark 
periods where we don't know if we're even going to be a band anymore."

Split rumours began when the band's notoriously devoted fans poured over 
the liner notes of 'Make Believe', in particular a passage from 
Shakespeare's final play 'The Tempest':

"This rough magic / I here abjure, and, when I have required / Some 
heavenly music, which even now I do / To work mine end upon their senses 
that / This airy charm is for, I'll break my staff / Bury it certain 
fathoms in the Earth / And deeper than did ever plummet sound / I'll 
drown my book."

Crucially, this was the final passage from Shakespeare's farewell work, 
and when questioned about the message, frontman Rivers Cuomo did little 
to dispel the rumours.

"When we were putting the album together and finishing up the artwork, I 
didn't know what was going to happen in the future and I told everyone 
that. I told them, 'Let's commit to this year, and see what happens'. 
And that was one of the reasons why I put that quote in there, because I 
thought it's a really nice way to say goodbye, if it is a goodbye."

Bell also commented on the quote saying, "When I saw that quote, I 
thought the same thing. I was studying Shakespeare at a university 
during the making of 'Make Believe', and it did spark some concern, and 
I asked Rivers about it. We never directly say, 'So, does this mean this 
is our last record? What does this mean?' But I knew he took Shakespeare 
too, and maybe it struck a chord with him."

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

ducdame

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1524  Thursday, 15 September 2005

From: 		Lysbeth Benkert-Rasmussen <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Wednesday, 14 Sep 2005 11:11:05 -0500
Subject: 	ducdame

A colleague of mine is writing occasional music for a production of As 
You Like It, and is also setting the play's lyrics to music.

How does one pronounce "ducdame" and how would you hyphenate it?

Thank you for your help,
Lysbeth

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Notion of Time

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1522  Thursday, 15 September 2005

From: 		Edna Z. Boris <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Wednesday, 14 Sep 2005 09:11:38 -0400
Subject: 	Suggestions for Readings on the Notion of Time

This spring for the first time I will be teaching a "capstone" course 
that links "Humanism, Science and Technology."  The theme I have 
selected is "the notion of time."

Among the readings I'm thinking of including are Stephen Hawking's A 
Brief History of Time and Shakespeare's Richard II because of Richard's 
line about his having wasted time which now wastes him, but time is a 
theme in almost all of Shakespeare's writing, so I'm not convinced that 
that would be the best Shakespeare play to include if there's room for 
only one.

I'd welcome suggestions on any readings, non-Shakespearean and 
Shakespearean (which sonnets, for instance).

Edna Boris
LaGuardia Community College

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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