2005

BBC Shakespeare This Autumn

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1606  Saturday, 24 September 2005

From: 		Jim Blackie <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Thursday, 22 Sep 2005 13:21:21 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 	BBC Shakespeare This Autumn

I am admittedly new to the sonnets and to the "biography" of WS himself. 
Nonetheless, it came as a surprise to me to learn that the WH of the 
sonnets was not really HW, Henry Wriothesley, 3rd Earl of Southampton, 
and patron to WS. I imagine I had been merrily going about thinking on 
HW was patron, as WS probably needed little patronage once his fame was 
established in London. To hear this both from a member of this esteemed 
list AND a copy of "Shakespeare's Sonnets" an analysis by J. Dover 
Wilson, astounded me. I am further surprised to read Ms Greenhalgh 
mention the Dark Lady was (probably) a courtesan, as I had read (and 
cannot for the life of me recall where I read this or who wrote it) that 
the most likely candidate was the Jewish wife of a townsman. And of 
course, that the young man had swept the dark lady off for at least one 
liaison. Could this be wrong, too?

Aside from my expressed surprise and admission of ignorance, I suppose 
I'm asking where this information/theory came from? Can anyone point me 
in the direction of some reliable reading material that explores 
this/these issues?

Still learning and reading---

Jim Blackie

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What Happens in "Hamlet"

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1605  Saturday, 24 September 2005

From: 		Bill Arnold <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Thursday, 22 Sep 2005 13:12:40 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 16.1588 What Happens in "Hamlet"
Comment: 	Re: SHK 16.1588 What Happens in "Hamlet"

Arnie Perlstein writes, "...I have read about half of Wilson's book on 
Hamlet, and am as impressed as Jim is by what I see...What I like most 
about Wilson is that he spends most of his time talking about very 
specific down to earth details about these characters and their 
motivations, basing them, it seems to me, on only a handful of extrinsic 
assumptions...I am really looking forward to testing what Wilson says 
against the text itself, but would like to hear as wide a range of 
comments first, so that I will be as open as I can be to the various 
interpretative options."

Well, as I have written already on this matter, I will respond 
summarily. Jim and Arnie are walking that yellow brick road that many of 
us have from Wilson to Bernard Grebanier's Castle of *The Heart of 
Hamlet." So, I recommend that to spare us all, you top off your golden 
trip with a look inside the castle, and behind the curtain, and blow 
away the smoke and see the mirrors!  Then, we can relate.  Gladly!

Bill Arnold
http://www.cwru.edu/affil/edis/scholars/arnold.htm

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Two New Authorship Studies

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1603  Saturday, 24 September 2005

From: 		Bob Grumman <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Thursday, 22 Sep 2005 16:43:04 -0400
Subject: 16.1579 Two New Authorship Studies
Comment: 	Re: SHK 16.1579 Two New Authorship Studies

 >I'm sorry to try the patience of SHAKSPEReans, but Ward
 >Elliott's stylometrical claims cannot be allowed to pass
 >unchallenged.

SNIP

 >Elliott declines to come to trial on equal terms, so I'll put
 >the matter clearly thus: He and his intellectual allies have
 >decisively proved by numerical analysis that certain anonymous
 >Elizabethan and Jacobean dramas are not by Shakespeare. But
 >every other measure (line and word parallels, analogies of
 >character and scene structure, thematic convergence, philosophical
 >and historical viewpoint, and many other dimensions familiar to
 >literary criticism) show quite otherwise.

Every other measure?!  Come on, Michael.  One measure is hard evidence, 
like names on title pages, and neither side has that.  Mr. Elliott and 
the other stylometricists haven't come close to convincing me of 
anything yet, but I'm convinced what they have to offer will become of 
central importance to authorship studies eventually.

--Bob Grumman

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Hamlet an Allegory

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1604  Saturday, 24 September 2005

[1] 	From: 	Bill Arnold <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Thursday, 22 Sep 2005 12:58:43 -0700 (PDT)
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 16.1586 Hamlet an Allegory

[2] 	From: 	Steve Roth <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Thursday, 22 Sep 2005 13:34:35 -0700
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 16.1556 Hamlet an Allegory


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Bill Arnold <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Thursday, 22 Sep 2005 12:58:43 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 16.1586 Hamlet an Allegory
Comment: 	Re: SHK 16.1586 Hamlet an Allegory

V. K. Inman writes, "Having been a soldier, actually a Marine, in 
Vietnam in 1969-70, I recall the challenge differs as regards which side 
of line the soldier is approached from.  If approached from within 
friendly lines in times of combat, the challenge indeed may be, 'Who 
goes there?'  If, however,  certain rustlings are heard from outside the 
lines the challenge usually consisted of, 'Di di mau (get out of here) 
M----er F---er,' followed by a grenade and a magazine of ammo. V. K. 
Inman Lt. Col. USMC Ret."

Very good point!  And I will relate this to Hamlet, Act I.  When in the 
USAF on a SAC base [to be unnamed, but overseas, in the 1950s during the 
cold war] I did guard duty one night with several others inside a wire 
fence perimeter with a dark treed forest outside, and one of the guards 
was hollering, "who goes there," and emptied his M-14 into the dark 
night when the intruder hit the fence.  The next morning they found a 
dead horse.  In the case of Hamlet, we do overlook the nature of guard 
duty and the extreme edginess of those on watch.  We note in Act I that 
there was fear, anxiety, sword play with a spirit, and from it all came 
the entire premise for the climax and resolution of the drama as things 
unfolded.  I am reminded of the concept of *Watch* in the NT which 
Shakespeare was amply familiar with, and the edginess of those on watch 
for their moment with ultimate truth: fear of the Unknown, fear of the 
Nature of Spirits, and fear of Death!

Bill Arnold
http://www.cwru.edu/affil/edis/scholars/arnold.htm

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Steve Roth <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Thursday, 22 Sep 2005 13:34:35 -0700
Subject: 16.1556 Hamlet an Allegory
Comment: 	Re: SHK 16.1556 Hamlet an Allegory

Gabriel Egan:

 >"If the Round or any other Officer come to search to watch &
 >Sentinels, when he doth first heare or see them approch, let him
 >so soone as he doth perceive them, demand with a lowd voice,
 >Qui va la? Who goes there?"

I've seen this before, but found it less than useful because I find the 
first "he" to be decidedly ambiguous. Ambiguous to the point that I'm 
not completely sure which side Gabriel is arguing here.

I think that "he" most likely refers to the sentinel, who's standing 
still. On hearing the approach of the officer making the rounds, the 
sentinel should say "who's there?"

If that's right, we still have a conundrum. Are there other similar 
sixteenth-century passages that shed light?

An anonymous commentator who the MLA Variorum editors take to be George 
Henry Lewes concluded in 1847 that Barnardo's call is fairly simply 
explained (though Lewes spends far too many words explaining it): he is 
afraid that the ghost is approaching, so a he calls out.

http://www.leoyan.com/global-language.com/ENFOLDED/output4.php?file=HWORKS0000/HW-3-4cn.xml

Saying that Hamlet is an allegory, by the way, is like saying that a 
jaguar (organic or mechanical) is a bicycle.

Steve

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Caliban's Father

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1602  Saturday, 24 September 2005

[1] 	From: 	YuJin Ko <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Thursday, 22 Sep 2005 14:59:48 -0400
	Subj: 	Caliban's Father

[2] 	From: 	Joseph Egert <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Thursday, 22 Sep 2005 20:42:45 +0000
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 16.1587 Caliban's Father


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		YuJin Ko <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Thursday, 22 Sep 2005 14:59:48 -0400
Subject: 	Caliban's Father

Dennis Taylor asks:

Has anyone argued that Caliban is Prospero's son by Sycorax ("this thing 
of darkness I / acknowledge mine"). I know there is an occasional 
tendency to make Miranda and Caliban contrasting "children", but has 
anyone argued the ultimate implication?

Well, I don't mean to use this forum to plug my own book, but as a 
matter of  fact, I have argued that position.  I have a chapter 
subtitled "How Many Children Had the Duke of Milan?" in my Mutability 
and Division on Shakespeare's Stage (2004).  I entertain the possibility 
that Caliban is Prospero's son by Sycorax, in part to allow the freer 
play of the rehearsal room to enter scholarly discussion, but also in 
part to revive what's good about A. C. Bradley (hence my mocking 
allusion to L. C.  Knights's mocking allusion to Bradley and his fellow 
character critics).

Yu Jin Ko
Wellesley College

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Joseph Egert <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Thursday, 22 Sep 2005 20:42:45 +0000
Subject: 16.1587 Caliban's Father
Comment: 	Re: SHK 16.1587 Caliban's Father

Bruce Young remains unconvinced as to Myriad Man's anagrammatic 
playfulness. There is little question Montaigne's "cannibal" figured 
prominently in the monster's moniker. I'd only emphasize Bruce's own 
concession: "the various allusions are not necessarily mutually exclusive."

Time to unleash Ariel, Bruce.

("You forgot "SEER"),
joSEph egERt

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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