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Home :: Archive :: 2005 :: August ::
Shakespeare's Macbeth in Kurdish
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1322  Thursday, 11 August 2005

[1]     From:   Martin Mueller <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 10 Aug 2005 08:12:47 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.1315 Shakespeare's Macbeth in Kurdish

[2]     From:   David Wallace <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 10 Aug 2005 12:15:05 -0700
        Subj:   Shakespeare's Macbeth in Kurdish


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Martin Mueller <
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Date:           Wednesday, 10 Aug 2005 08:12:47 -0500
Subject: 16.1315 Shakespeare's Macbeth in Kurdish
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.1315 Shakespeare's Macbeth in Kurdish

Why does Terence Hawkes think that Robert Projansky is stupid to hear
the hoofbeats in "Printing their prowd Hoofes i'th' receiving Earth"?
The verse begins with a dactyl, and "i'th' receving" probably scans as
"in the recei.." Thus the line contains one clear and one plausible
instance of a galloping feature, and it is quite plausible to construe
its prosodic features as an imitation of its meaning.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Wallace <
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Date:           Wednesday, 10 Aug 2005 12:15:05 -0700
Subject:        Shakespeare's Macbeth in Kurdish

Professor Hawkes mocks Robert Projansky's claim that hoof beats can be
heard in the line: "Printing their prowd Hoofes i'th' receiuing Earth".
I confess I hear no hooves. In a similar vein, I have heard it argued
that the repetition of the word "mocke" below (from Henry V) is aptly
reminiscent of a series of volleys in tennis. Will Professor Hawkes
share his opinion?

And tell the pleasant Prince, this Mocke of his
Hath turn'd his balles to Gun-stones, and his soule
Shall stand sore charged, for the wastefull vengeance
That shall flye with them: for many a thousand widows
Shall this his Mocke, mocke out of their deer husbands;
Mocke mothers from their sonnes, mock Castles downe:
And some are yet vngotten and vnborne,
That shal haue cause to curse the Dolphins scorne.

Cheers,
David Wallace

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