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Home :: Archive :: 2005 :: August ::
Shylock as Suffering Servant
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1344  Thursday, 18 August 2005

[1]     From:   D Bloom <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 17 Aug 2005 14:37:02 -0500
        Subj:   RE: SHK 16.1336 Shylock as Suffering Servant

[2]     From:   JD Markel <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 17 Aug 2005 13:31:56 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.1336 Shylock as Suffering Servant

[3]     From:   Elliott Stone <
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        Date:   Thursday, 18 Aug 2005 09:18:00 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.1336 Shylock as Suffering Servant


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           D Bloom <
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Date:           Wednesday, 17 Aug 2005 14:37:02 -0500
Subject: 16.1336 Shylock as Suffering Servant
Comment:        RE: SHK 16.1336 Shylock as Suffering Servant

Edmund Taft (reliable man) writes:

 >"So Shylock is the bully and Antonio the victim? OK (for the sake of
 >argument). If this is so, it reverses the situation at the start of the
 >play in which we learn how abominably Antonio treated Shylock in the
 >past (and will again, he promises!) Ergo, the Christians have been
 >bullies for nearly 1700 years and Shylock for a few days, at most."

Well, Ed, you got me this time. I have to confess that I do consider
homicide a much more serious offense than issuing spiteful insults.
Since my whole interpretation of the play is grounded (in some measure)
on this view, if it's wrong, then the interpretation is wrong. No doubt
about it.

Cheers,
don

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           JD Markel <
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Date:           Wednesday, 17 Aug 2005 13:31:56 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 16.1336 Shylock as Suffering Servant
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.1336 Shylock as Suffering Servant

Larry writes:

 >"Analogously, Portia pretends to be a judge in order
 >to present an unduly restrictive interpretation of the
 >bond which a real judge might have scruples about
 >doing."

Shakespeare didn't invent the trial scene, it comes from Il Pecorone.
And conflict with strict laws is hardly unknown as dramatic device.  For
example, Midsummer Nights Dream.  S did add/invent the law with "another
hold."  Therein lies an allegory...

"But who quarrels with the result?"

Are you new to this thread?  Just about everyone.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Elliott Stone <
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Date:           Thursday, 18 Aug 2005 09:18:00 -0400
Subject: 16.1336 Shylock as Suffering Servant
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.1336 Shylock as Suffering Servant

Richard Kennedy tells us that Chalmer's theory of the involvement of
Queen Elizabeth in the Sonnets does not have many adherents. I do not
believe that to be the case.

I suggest that one might want to look at SHAKE-SPEARES SONNETS THE
MONUMENT" February 2005 Meadow Geese Press by Hank Whittemore who in 843
very large pages makes that exact point.

Best,
Elliott H. Stone

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