2005

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1431  Tuesday, 30 August 2005

[1] 	From: 	Robin Hamilton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Monday, 29 Aug 2005 13:54:02 +0100
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 16.1418 Shylock, Hamlet, et al.

[2] 	From: 	Stuart Manger <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Monday, 29 Aug 2005 17:06:55 +0100
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 16.1418 Shylock, Hamlet, et al.

[3] 	From: 	Kenneth Chan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Tuesday, 30 Aug 2005 01:15:08 +0800
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 16.1418 Shylock, Hamlet, et al.


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Robin Hamilton <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Monday, 29 Aug 2005 13:54:02 +0100
Subject: 16.1418 Shylock, Hamlet, et al.
Comment: 	Re: SHK 16.1418 Shylock, Hamlet, et al.

 >However I like to
 >remember the latest and strongest transfiguration of the character -
 >Luther. In that context the father of Luther is referred to by Hamlet's
 >comment of "old mole". Luther's father was a miner.
 >
 >Florence Amit

I often think of Hamlet and Luther and Faust (Johann Sobellicus) sitting 
together supping ale in a tavern in Wittenberg, when up comes a drawer 
with a letter.  Hamlet opens it and mutters, "Oh bother, Dad's just 
snuffed it and I have to go back to Elsinore for the funeral.  See you 
later, folks."

"Go with God, my son," intones Luther piously.

"I seriously doubt that," avers Faust, prophetically.

Robin Hamilton

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Stuart Manger <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Monday, 29 Aug 2005 17:06:55 +0100
Subject: 16.1418 Shylock, Hamlet, et al.
Comment: 	Re: SHK 16.1418 Shylock, Hamlet, et al.

 From Florence Amit:

 >Joseph Egert asks 'who is Hamlet's father?'. The most obvious answer to
 >that one in consideration of his religiosity and the inclusion of his
 >"prophetic soul" is that Hamlet's father is God. However I like to
 >remember the latest and strongest transfiguration of the character -
 >Luther. In that context the father of Luther is referred to by Hamlet's
 >comment of "old mole". Luther's father was a miner.

Please, please tell me someone - this is a joke, right?  Joe..... this 
is all your fault!

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Kenneth Chan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Tuesday, 30 Aug 2005 01:15:08 +0800
Subject: 16.1418 Shylock, Hamlet, et al.
Comment: 	Re: SHK 16.1418 Shylock, Hamlet, et al.

Bill Arnold writes:

 >"if I read you correctly you are arguing that Will
 >Shakespeare was a preacher and his plays are
 >sermons, right?"

Actually, the words "preacher" and "sermons" contain many connotations 
that are not applicable to Shakespeare; so I would avoid using those terms.

Shakespeare's messages are not derived from a mere intellectual 
interpretation of any particular religion's scriptural doctrine. The 
nature of the messages strongly suggests that they are the direct 
realizations of an advanced mystic who has actually undertaken the 
arduous task of transforming his life and personality towards the 
spiritual ideal. True aspirants of the spiritual path - the saints and 
the bodhisattvas - attain their realizations from direct experience.

Shakespeare's plays are designed to impart profound messages in a truly 
unique manner. The plays are carefully crafted to make us learn via 
direct emotional experience. This is a far more effective way to convey 
a message than merely stating it in words. Shakespeare's plays are thus 
more akin to initiations, where one learns because one has effectively 
lived through it.

For these reasons, Shakespeare's plays are a unique and priceless gift 
to mankind. It would be a tragedy if we continue to deny this fact. 
While I respect everyone's right to their own opinions, it is important 
that we first look closely at the evidence. The evidence in 
Shakespeare's plays are actually overwhelming.

If a blind man wants to walk off a cliff because he insists on his right 
to believe that there is no cliff, are we just going to sit back and do 
nothing more than respect that right? Surely, we would plead with him to 
at least examine the evidence before proceeding.

So, in the same vein, I am pleading that we also examine the evidence 
carefully before denying the priceless legacy that Shakespeare has left 
us. Please, please look at the evidence.

With best wishes,
Kenneth Chan
http://homepage.mac.com/sapphirestudios/qod

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