Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 2005 :: July ::
Help with the Sonnets
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1175  Monday, 4 July 2005

[1]     From:   Peter Bridgman <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Friday, 1 Jul 2005 20:00:15 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.11647 Help with the Sonnets

[2]     From:   Larry Weiss <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Saturday, 2 Jul 2005 05:41:49 -0400 (EDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.11647 Help with the Sonnets


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Peter Bridgman <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Friday, 1 Jul 2005 20:00:15 +0100
Subject: 16.11647 Help with the Sonnets
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.11647 Help with the Sonnets

Martin Green writes ...

 >I have long maintained that Wriothesley (Rosely) was the Rose (the red
 >and white rose) of the Sonnets, most recently in "The Pronunciation of
 >Wriothesley," in the April 2005 issue of English Studies.

I thought it was/is pronounced Rizley.

Peter Bridgman

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Saturday, 2 Jul 2005 05:41:49 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 16.11647 Help with the Sonnets
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.11647 Help with the Sonnets

 >"Omne animal post coitum triste" is, of course, an obvious reading of
 >sonnet 129. Equally obvious, I think, is "post masturbationem" (which
 >then could be regarded as unfaithfulness) - in such a reading, the
 >"waste of shame" is  the semen spilled on the ground (Genesis 38) and
 >not a female "waist" and pudendum.

But:  "Until action lust is perjured, murd'rous, bloody, full of blame/
       Savage, extreme, rude, cruel, not to trust"

One need not go to such lengths to engage one's hand.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, 
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.