Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Current Postings RSS

Announcements RSS

Home :: Archive :: 2005 :: July ::
Help with the Sonnets
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1191  Friday, 8 July 2005

[1]     From:   Rainbow Saari <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Friday, 8 Jul 2005 10:02:52 +1200
        Subj:   SHK 161187 Help with the Sonnets: smelling out the Rose

[2]     From:   Martin Green <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
        Date:   Thursday, 07 Jul 2005 23:05:06 +0000
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.1187 Help with the Sonnets


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Rainbow Saari <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Friday, 8 Jul 2005 10:02:52 +1200
Subject: Help with the Sonnets: smelling out the Rose
Comment:        SHK 161187 Help with the Sonnets: smelling out the Rose

Regarding:

 >"An Epitaph on the death, of the Right honorable and vertuous Lord Henry
 >WRISLEY, the Noble Earle of Southhampton: who lieth interred at
 >Touchfeelde in the Countie of Hamshyre, the 30. day of November 1581.
 >and in the 24. yeare of our most drad and Soveraigne Ladie Elizabeth by
 >the grace of God, of England, Fraunce, & Ireland Queen. &c."

This 'phonetic proof' that Richard Kennedy offers us 'that WRIOTHESLEY
seems to be spoken as
WRISLEY, and that there is no ROSE pronounced in the name' is not as
unequivocal as might be wished. In it we have the Southampton home,
Titchfield, spelled as 'Touchfeelde'. In letters dated from the 1530's
and 40's Titchfield is spelled variously as Tychefeld, Titchfield,
Tichfelde (M. Green's  Wriothesley's Roses, pp. 272-273)

If the letter 'i' or 'y' in the name Titchfield was pronounced by the
Epitaph writer as a sound he spelled as 'ou', how can we be sure that
the 'i' in that WRISLEY was pronounced then as we pronounce it now?

I have read Martin Green's recent article on this issue and find his new
evidence on pronunciation to be compelling. I highly recommend it to
others interested in the topic.

Cheers all,
Rainbow Saari

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Martin Green <
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 >
Date:           Thursday, 07 Jul 2005 23:05:06 +0000
Subject: 16.1187 Help with the Sonnets
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.1187 Help with the Sonnets

In response to Richard Kennedy's observations:

A.F.Pollard, who wrote the 1899 DNB article stating that Wriothesley was
in Tudor times pronounced Wrisley offered no evidence in support of that
statement; dozens of other suggested pronunciations can be found in the
various pronouncing dictionaries cited in my article. Similarly, the
Risely spelling cited by Mr. Kennedy - -  one of many 16th century
spellings of Wriothesley as Wrythesly or Wrysley  ("phonetically" the
same as the "Risely"  spelling relied on by Mr. Kennedy) - -  does not
settle the question, in view of other 16th century spellings  such as
Wresley or Wrosley  (not cited by Mr. Kennedy, but cited in my article,
which, I think, does settle the question).

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, 
 This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
 
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.
 

©2011 Hardy Cook. All rights reserved.