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Home :: Archive :: 2005 :: July ::
Shakespeare and Aging
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1233  Thursday, 21 July 2005

[1]     From:   Jim Lake <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 20 Jul 2005 10:53:58 -0500
        Subj:   RE: SHK 16.1227 Shakespeare and Aging

[2]     From:   David Richman <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 20 Jul 2005 13:38:45 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.1227 Shakespeare and Aging

[3]     From:   Marvin Krims <
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        Date:   Wednesday, 20 Jul 2005 14:35:38 -0400
        Subj:   RE: SHK 16.1227 Shakespeare and Aging


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jim Lake <
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Date:           Wednesday, 20 Jul 2005 10:53:58 -0500
Subject: 16.1227 Shakespeare and Aging
Comment:        RE: SHK 16.1227 Shakespeare and Aging

The World Shakespeare Bibliography on line provides 13 references to
Shakespeare and "aging."

Jim Lake

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           David Richman <
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Date:           Wednesday, 20 Jul 2005 13:38:45 -0400
Subject: 16.1227 Shakespeare and Aging
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.1227 Shakespeare and Aging

But doesn't Adam, entering, back-borne, on Jaques's last lines, suggest
an alternative view?  He is weak from hunger, but not by a long shot the
second child of Jaques's imagining.  And Prospero (whom I am getting
ready to play in a production to be staged on a small island off the
coast of Portsmouth, New Hampshire) is devoting only every THIRD thought
to his grave. Presumably, the other two-thirds of his thoughts will be
devoted to other matter.  With age may come a certain tempering;
Prospero, after all, wins through, with immense difficulty, to nobler
reason against fury. At the same time (there is always an "at the same
time in Shakespeare) the plays are clear about the infirmities, physical
and mental, of age.  Lear and Prospero grow old differently.  "A truth
in art is one whose contradictory is also true."  David Richman

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Marvin Krims <
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Date:           Wednesday, 20 Jul 2005 14:35:38 -0400
Subject: 16.1227 Shakespeare and Aging
Comment:        RE: SHK 16.1227 Shakespeare and Aging

Certainly not a pretty picture for us older guys but all too accurate  .
. .  . eventually. I'd like to hear more of what we can learn from Prospero.

Marvin

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