2005

New and Improved Lear

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.11641  Thursday, 30 June 2005

From:           Stephen C. Rose <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 29 Jun 2005 09:37:27 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 16.1158 New and Improved Lear
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.1158 New and Improved Lear

RE: "Bible is based on universal morality"

Hardly the case. Wherever you slice it.

I view the Pentateuch as an exercise in blaming the deity for the human
situation. (Noah being a turning point when G-d essentially says, Get
off my back.)

Deuteronomists-like some of Job's comforters are incurably-moralistic.
And somewhat contemporary in that respect.

Some of the more savvy prophets propound utopian visions that are
redolent of a very different morality than that in the earlier stories
where G-d is definitely helping the tribe to stand up to other tribes
with other G-ds. The GoYS Gambit.  But the Psalms restores the God on
Your Side zapping enemies theme.

The new Testament has two distinctive moralities in tension. The
perfectionistic Beatitudinal Way propounded by Jesus and the creedal
moralism one can infer from some writings of Paul and other authors. The
first is iconoclastic and the second is authoritarian-if efficacious for
a community being crucified, burned and eaten by animals for several
centuries.

I think when people talk of universal morality they should think of
rights-a more fruitful avenue for creating a universal, er, morality.
Let me know when we have one.

Cheers, S

_______________________________________________________________
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Lucrece Variants

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.11640  Thursday, 30 June 2005

[1]     From:   William Proctor Williams <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Jun 2005 10:03:45 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.1161 Lucrece Variants

[2]     From:   Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Jun 2005 17:21:25 +0100
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.1161 Lucrece Variants

[3]     From:   Kathy Dent <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Jun 2005 21:54:44 +0100
        Subj:   RE: SHK 16.1161 Lucrece Variants


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           William Proctor Williams <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 29 Jun 2005 10:03:45 -0400
Subject: 16.1161 Lucrece Variants
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.1161 Lucrece Variants

It doesn't have to be even as extreme as Bill Arnold suggests.  For
example, +Hamlet+ 1.5.40-41 [in some modern editions] offers us:

     O my prophetike soule, my vncle! my vncle!    Q1

     O my propheticke soule! my Vncle?            Q2

     O my Propheticke soule: mine Vncle?        F1

and this comes out as,

     O my prophetic soul!  My uncle!               Arden2

         O my prophetic soul!
     My uncle?                        Riverside, Cambridge3 & Oxford3 &
Pelican3

as well as,

     tIqwIj: leSSov vIghajlaw'! vavIoDnI'wI'!

in Klingon

How texts read, even in the finest detail, matters.

William Proctor Williams

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 29 Jun 2005 17:21:25 +0100
Subject: 16.1161 Lucrece Variants
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.1161 Lucrece Variants

Jack Heller wrote:

 >I thought of long ways of responding to this, but perhaps the
 >best way is to recommend a book, UNEDITING THE
 >RENAISSANCE by Leah Marcus.

Upon finishing this book, I'd recommend reading:

Leah Marcus "Afterword: Confessions of a reformed uneditor" in Andrew
Murphy (ed) _The Renaissance text: Theory, editing, textuality_
(Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2000) pp. 211-216.

It would only be overstating the case a little to say that the
experience of actually doing some editing (of the works of Queen
Elizabeth 1) appears to have made Marcus take back a lot of what's in
the monograph.

Gabriel Egan

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Kathy Dent <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 29 Jun 2005 21:54:44 +0100
Subject: 16.1161 Lucrece Variants
Comment:        RE: SHK 16.1161 Lucrece Variants

Bill Arnold comments: "Written contracts are absolutely dependent upon
every *single* word and the meaning of a valid contract misread by a
lawyer can put the whole business underlying the document into question."

True, but a play is not a contract.

He then goes on to suggest: "For instance, if the usurper King Claudius
were to say in one folio "O nephew, I did not murder your father, Old
Hamlet, so what?" and in another folio with one word missing-say, found
by our illustrious Hardy, and proving my point-were to say, "O nephew, I
did murder your father, Old Hamlet, so what?" do you still hold to your
concept that textual interpretation would be meaningless?"

Leaving aside the hypothetical nature of this example, I would hold that
the rest of the play - especially Hamlet's reply to this remark and any
following dialogue that may occur in this fantasy play in Bill's mind -
would suggest the meaning of these textual variants: whether, for
example, this is a revising hand or whether it's more likely to be a
scribal or compositorial error.  Whatever discussion were to be had
about this single word variation, I contend that it would not and could
not alter the meaning of the whole play.

Kathy Dent

_______________________________________________________________
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Help with the Sonnets

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.11638  Thursday, 30 June 2005

[1]     From:   Markus Marti <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Jun 2005 15:35:21 +0200
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.1155 Help with the Sonnets

[2]     From:   Jack Heller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Jun 2005 08:41:00 -0500 (EST)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.1159 Help with the Sonnets

[3]     From:   Marvin Krims <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Jun 2005 10:20:15 -0400
        Subj:   RE: SHK 16.1159 Help with the Sonnets

[4]     From:   Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Jun 2005 11:51:17 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.1159 Help with the Sonnets

[5]     From:   M. Rick Smith <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Wednesday, 29 Jun 2005 12:55:56 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.1155 Help with the Sonnets


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Markus Marti <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 29 Jun 2005 15:35:21 +0200
Subject: 16.1155 Help with the Sonnets
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.1155 Help with the Sonnets

Almost everywhere; but look especially at: 109-119, 152, and
(ironically): 116

Markus Marti

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Jack Heller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 29 Jun 2005 08:41:00 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 16.1159 Help with the Sonnets
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.1159 Help with the Sonnets

While Sonnet 138 emphasizes the lady's unfaithfulness, the speaker also
confesses untruthfulness.

Heller

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Marvin Krims <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 29 Jun 2005 10:20:15 -0400
Subject: 16.1159 Help with the Sonnets
Comment:        RE: SHK 16.1159 Help with the Sonnets

Thanks, Peter and others but I finally stumbled on it in #109.

Marvin

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Larry Weiss <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 29 Jun 2005 11:51:17 -0400
Subject: 16.1159 Help with the Sonnets
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.1159 Help with the Sonnets

 >Certainly infidelity to Anne Shakespeare
 >is implied by Sonnet 129 ("Th'expense of spirit in a waste of shame").

Certainly?  I have never considered or read that anyone else considered
this sonnet as having such a specific referent.  Rather, isn't it an
extended treatment of the phenomenon Horace noted more pithily in his
famous epigram:  Omne animal post coitum triste est, praeter galumque et
mulierem.  Since WS did not write the sonnets from the standpoint of
women or roosters, only the first part is illustrated in the poem.

[5]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           M. Rick Smith <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 29 Jun 2005 12:55:56 -0400
Subject: 16.1155 Help with the Sonnets
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.1155 Help with the Sonnets

Isn't it possible that Sonnet 98 alludes to alternative dalliances
figured by its inadequate spring flowers?

M. Rick Smith, Associate Professor of English, Kent State University
Trumbull

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Shakespeare Ladies' Club

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.11639  Thursday, 30 June 2005

From:           M. Rick Smith <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Wednesday, 29 Jun 2005 12:58:28 -0400
Subject: 16.1160 Shakespeare Ladies' Club
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.1160 Shakespeare Ladies' Club

Just a trivial inquiry:  is Fiona Richie the Fiona Richie of The Thistle
and the Shamrock in addition to the writer of what looks to be a very
interesting dissertation?  In any case, thanks for the references,
although I did not directly seek 'em.

Sorry.

M. Rick Smith, Associate Professor of English, Kent State University
Trumbull

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Bard Goes Broadband

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.11637  Thursday, 30 June 2005

From:           Al Magary <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Thursday, 30 Jun 2005 00:37:10 -0700
Subject:        Bard Goes Broadband

The Bard Goes Broadband

icCoventry.co.uk, June 29, 2005

http://iccoventry.icnetwork.co.uk/0100news/0150swarksnews/tm_objectid=15677805&method=full&siteid=50003&headline=the-bard-goes-broadband-name_page.html

The latest wireless broadband technology is being harnessed to give
tourists a more modern experience of William Shakespeare's home town in
Warwickshire, it was announced today.

Visitors to the bard's birthplace in Stratford-upon-Avon will be able to
hire hand-held personal digital assistant (PDA) devices to get an online
insight into the town's cultural and artistic heritage.

Project director Tim Luft believes using new technology could breathe
new life into tourist destinations whose popularity has until now relied
solely on guidebooks and word-of-mouth.

"The launch of Stratford Unplugged marks an exciting new chapter for
tourism in one of the UK's most famous and best-loved towns," he said.

"Using the latest BT wireless broadband in this innovative way will
enable us to give people a completely new visitor experience.

"Given Stratford's rich heritage, it is fitting that it should take
centre stage in taking UK tourism into a new age to preserve such a
significant era by embracing exciting developing communications
technologies in this way, to the benefit of the town and the industries
upon which it depends for its livelihood."

The scheme, which uses public access wireless broadband hotspots, has
been developed by BT with Coventry University, Staffordshire University,
Hewlett Packard and Stratford town centre's management team.

Information on attractions is beamed via tiny aerials near the most
popular attractions to the pocket diary-sized device as visitors pass.

Users can also browse the Internet on the move as well as send
photographs to family and friends as they take in the sights.

Frank Mills, BT's regional director for the West Midlands, said: "The
12-month pilot is the first of its kind in the UK and marks a
significant step in the development and growth of e-tourism.

[Similar story at BBC News:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/technology/4633741.stm

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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