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Home :: Archive :: 2005 :: June ::
Designations
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1128  Wednesday, 22 June 2005

[1]     From:   Bill Arnold <
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 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 21 Jun 2005 07:40:16 -0700 (PDT)
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.1121 Designations [ *Christology* ]

[2]     From:   John W. Kennedy <
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 >
        Date:   Tuesday, 21 Jun 2005 12:17:01 -0400
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.1121 Designations

[3]     From:   Matthew Baynham <
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 >
        Date:   Wednesday, 22 Jun 2005 06:53:51 GMT
        Subj:   Designations


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Bill Arnold <
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 >
Date:           Tuesday, 21 Jun 2005 07:40:16 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 16.1121 Designations [ *Christology* ]
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.1121 Designations [ *Christology* ]

Martin Steward writes, "What exactly does Bill Arnold mean by
'Christology'...? It's always puzzled me."

Golly, Martin, go into any major university and walk into the stacks
marked *C* and you will find rows and rows and rows and rows and rows
and rows and rows [that's for Hem-emphasis from "Hills like white
elephants  :)  ] of books under/on/about *Christology* [ ! ]

I googled the following for you using *Christology.*

Book results for Christology
        Christology - by Hans Schwarz - 364 pages

CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Christology
Christology is that part of theology which deals with Our Lord Jesus Christ.
www.newadvent.org/cathen/14597a.htm - 53k - Cached - Similar pages

Christology
Several articles on Christology. A source of information for deeper
understanding of religious subjects.
mb-soft.com/believe/text/christol.htm - 42k - Cached - Similar pages

Christology - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Christology is that part of Christian theology that studies and defines
who Jesus ... Christology may also cover questions concerning the
Trinity, and what, ...
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christology - 18k - Jun 19, 2005 - Cached -
Similar pages

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Christology
Jack Dean Kingsburg, The Christology of Mark's Gospel (Philadelphia: ...
Rudolph Schnackenburg, Jesus in the Gospels: a Biblical Christology,
trans. ...
camellia.shc.edu/theology/Christology.htm - 33k - Cached - Similar pages

Christ Jesus, Christology, Solus Christus, Prophet, Preist, King The
Threshold is a navigation tool to the best Christ-centered resources on
the web. The user is directed to classic articles and resources of
historical ...
www.monergism.com/thethreshold/ articles/topic/christ.html - 104k -
Cached - Similar pages

Grace Online Library | Puritan, Reformed and Calvinistic Articles
Christian articles and resources from a Reformed or Puritan perspective
on subjects like Calvinism, Dispensationalism, Election, and the
Christian Home.
www.graceonlinelibrary.org/theology/christology.asp - 21k - Cached -
Similar pages

Bible Truth Discussion Forum ->Christology
Bible Truth Discussion Forum ->The Armoury ->Christology ...
Soteriology, - Christology, ---- New Testament, ---- Old Testament, ----
Historical ...
www.thechristadelphians.org/ forums/index.php?showforum=16 - 36k -
Cached - Similar pages

Jesus - Resources for Catholic Educators
List of links on Jesus and christology. ... Christ, Lunatic or GOD;
Christology - Internet Theology Resources Systematic Theology;
Christology Outline ...
www.silk.net/RelEd/christ.htm - 37k - Cached - Similar pages

CHRISTOLOGY
Christology is that part of theology which deals with Our Lord Jesus
Christ. ... We shall here briefly review the Christology of St. Paul, of
the Catholic ...
www.ewtn.com/library/CHRIST/CE_CHRIS.HTM - 38k - Cached - Similar pages

What is Christology?
What is Christology? What does the Bible teach about the Person and work
of Jesus Christ?
www.gotquestions.org/Christology.html - 24k - Cached - Similar pages

Bill Arnold
http://www.cwru.edu/affil/edis/scholars/arnold.htm

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           John W. Kennedy <
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 >
Date:           Tuesday, 21 Jun 2005 12:17:01 -0400
Subject: 16.1121 Designations
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.1121 Designations

John Briggs <
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 >

 >I'm sorry, Hardy, but you are wrong here - the Roman Catholics don't
 >accept the term "Apocrypha".  The term "deutero-canonical" was invented
 >as one that everyone could agree upon!

Actually, no. "Deutero-canonical" is only acceptable to Roman Catholics
-- and perhaps to the Eastern Orthodox, as well. But Roman Catholics
/do/ use the word to refer to spurious books, otherwise usually known as
"pseudepigrapha".

Protestants,        Roman Catholic        Eastern
Anglicans

Apocrypha           Deutero-canonical     ?

Pseudepigrapha      Apocrypha or          Apocrypha or
                     Pseudepigrapha        Pseudepigrapha

Bill Arnold <
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 >

 >I do not believe we are splitting hairs here.  Job as cited from the KJV
 >has many who allege it stops at any number of Bible stations going back
 >to the Septuagint.
 >
 >The Book of Job came from the Septuagint which according to history was
 >a document translated by 70 Hebrew scholars who used their Hebrew texts.
 > I cannot read Hebrew and cannot testify to what you state with
 >conviction.  It seems perfectly fine to me to cite Job from the Old
 >Testament of the KJV because that is where I find it, and although
 >others-maybe you and David Basch read Hebrew-find it elsewhere, I would
 >be remiss in citing a text I have not read, nor understand, nor am sure
 >is the same as the text I do cite.  Finally, I assure you that
 >Christians consider the Old Testament as half of their Judaic-Christian
 >Christian Scripture.  It resides in the first half of the KJV, and
 >always shall as a monument of the Shakespearean Age.

You seem confused. The Septuagint is indeed a late-Hellenistic-era Greek
translation of the Hebrew scriptures, which includes some passages and
books which were, subsequent to the foundation of Xtianity, rejected by
all Jews, and, much later, by Protestants. But the Septuagint is not the
underlying text of the KJV (alias AV), except in the section known to
Protestants as "The Apocrypha", for which (for the most part) there is
no other source. At any rate, Job is to be found in a Hebrew text that
is older than the Septuagint.

One might also add that the Old Testament constitutes a great deal more
than half of the Christian Bible.

Martin Steward <
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 >

 >What exactly does Bill Arnold mean by "Christology"...?

I don't know about Bill Arnold, but in small-o orthodox Xtian theology,
it is the study of the nature of the God-Man union in Christ.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Matthew Baynham <
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 >
Date:           Wednesday, 22 Jun 2005 06:53:51 GMT
Subject:        Designations

Whilst I respect the sensitivities of Jewish people to the term 'Old
Testament', I don't think that one can make a universal rule that
'Hebrew Scriptures' is the only acceptable usage in academic writing or
in general.

The first Christians were, obviously enough, Messianic Jews: devout Jews
who were looking for the fulfilment of scriptural prophecy - and later
Messianic expectation - in their own days. They became convinced that
the prophecies of the Hebrew Scriptures had been fulfilled in the person
and work of Jesus of Nazareth; and this was a vital strand of their
first preaching, which was by Jews to Jews. There is little doubt that,
after Jesus' death, they expected his imminent return, in line with
Jewish apocalyptic expectation, of which the second half of the book of
Daniel is an early example.

Most Jews disagreed with all this; as do the overwhelming majority of
Jews now. When the canon of the Christian bible was to decided upon, by
now by a Christian church most of whom were not Jewish, there were those
who would not have included an Old Testament, but the view that the
fulfilment of the Hebrew scriptures in Jesus of Nazareth was essential
to the Christian tradition prevailed.

In brief, I feel comfortable using the term Old Testament because these
scriptures are an essential and deeply valued part of my Christian
tradition, first reverenced by the Jew Jesus of Nazareth himself and
then by his first Jewish followers in respect of him. With regard to
Shakespeare scholarship, I usually use the term 'Old Testament' because
of this and because Shakespeare and his culture were part of that
tradition too: so that, for example, in my MPhil dissertation I used
this term throughout. But at the point of first usage I inserted a
footnote explaining that I wanted to acknowledge at the outset that
these narratives did not first belong to Christians.

Matthew Baynham

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