2005

A Knock on Rylance and the Globe

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1090  Tuesday, 14 June 2005

[1]     From:   Arthur Lindley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 13 Jun 2005 22:05:53 +0800
        Subj:   RE: SHK 16.1081 A Knock on Rylance and the Globe

[2]     From:   R. A. Cantrell <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 13 Jun 2005 09:12:57 -0500
        Subj:   Re: SHK 16.1081 A Knock on Rylance and the Globe

[3]     From:   Martin Steward <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 13 Jun 2005 19:04:02 +0100
        Subj:   SHK 16.1081 A Knock on Rylance and the Globe

[4]     From:   Sandra Sparks <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
        Date:   Monday, 13 Jun 2005 14:29:14 -0400
        Subj:   RE: SHK 16.1081 A Knock on Rylance and the Globe


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Arthur Lindley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 13 Jun 2005 22:05:53 +0800
Subject: 16.1081 A Knock on Rylance and the Globe
Comment:        RE: SHK 16.1081 A Knock on Rylance and the Globe

It's more fun that way, Al.  Just as George Galloway is more fun than
Norm Coleman.

Regards,
Arthur Lindley

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           R. A. Cantrell <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 13 Jun 2005 09:12:57 -0500
Subject: 16.1081 A Knock on Rylance and the Globe
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.1081 A Knock on Rylance and the Globe

 >Shakespeare's modest
 >background marked him out as precisely the sort of young buck who made
 >it big on the Elizabethan literary scene."

Hoobuddy, where to start?

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Martin Steward <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 13 Jun 2005 19:04:02 +0100
Subject: A Knock on Rylance and the Globe
Comment:        SHK 16.1081 A Knock on Rylance and the Globe

"Sometimes I get a little frightened when browsing the British press.
Why is it more vicious than American media?"

But isn't Betts's article fantastic? Brilliantly written and mostly
right. Some real "I wish I'd said that" phrases to savour.

m

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From:           Sandra Sparks <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 13 Jun 2005 14:29:14 -0400
Subject: 16.1081 A Knock on Rylance and the Globe
Comment:        RE: SHK 16.1081 A Knock on Rylance and the Globe

Oh, in this matter, I'm very glad the press can be vicious. Rylance
deserved the kick.

When I read earlier this year that Rylance (along with, another shock,
Derek Jacobi) does not believe that Shakespeare wrote any of the plays,
I was glad to know that he was leaving Shakespeare's Globe. The
Shakespeare Oxford Society was so proud of having two jewels in their
jester's crown!

It not only denigrates WS, but the other men who actually did write
parts of the plays, from George Peele to John Fletcher.

As for Pericles - has anyone actually EVER seen a good production of it?
  I've love to hear about it. We've had two gos at it here - damned
difficult. No wonder they left it out of the first folio.

Sandra Sparks

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S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Shakespeare and Measures...

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1089  Tuesday, 14 June 2005

From:           Bill Arnold <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Monday, 13 Jun 2005 07:49:42 -0700 (PDT)
Subject:        Shakespeare and Measures...

This is particularly directed to our British members of SHAKSPER, but I
am interested in all responses.  Here in America we are still into
inches and feet, and I am under the impression that in Europe and Great
Britain that they are now into millimeters and meters.  So, my question
is, if the latter is so, how has that affected reading and staging
Shakespeare and measures, weights, speeds, money, lengths, whatever.  I
have not studied the plays as to measures, and I include more than
length, in my question, but has anyone looked at the plays in these
terms?  Will future generations see the plays the way Americans will?

Bill Arnold
http://www.cwru.edu/affil/edis/scholars/arnold.htm

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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
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Theatre of Blood Play

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1087  Tuesday, 14 June 2005

From:           Hardy M. Cook <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, June 14, 2005
Subject:        Theatre of Blood Play

"Tempers in the temple"
By Keith Miller
TLS: June 3, 2005
p. 18


Theatre of Blood is something of an oddity: a film (1971) about plays,
itself now adapted, with no little ingenuity, into a play. The original
was a vehicle for Vincent Price - an actor who often behaved on film as
though he might prefer to be on stage. Price plays Edward Lionheart, a
Shakespearean actor of the Sturm und Drang school, who exacts a baroque
and sanguinary revenge on the critics who have destroyed his career. The
new adaptation by Lee Simpson and Phelim McDermott (and co-produced with
the National by their company, Improbable) retains the film's 1970s
setting, not to mention its liberal use of what theatricals used to
refer to as Kensington Gore. The play is confined to a dilapidated
Edwardian theatre, the proscenium of which has been sutured into the
Lyttelton like a botched facelift. The contrast between the necrotic
plaster and the crisp concrete is not merely picturesque, though it
takes us a while to realize this. Lionheart is played by Jim Broadbent.
He has lured seven critics into the theatre on seven different pretexts,
each of which whispers slyly to a vice or vanity of the critic in
question - drink, sex, advancement, and so on. The bitchy septet are
rapidly segregated and, one by one, dispatched. In every case, insult,
in the form of a fruity Shakespearian peroration from Lionheart, is
added to an injury which has been lifted from the play under excerpt. . . .

  . . . The biggest laugh of the evening is also the cheapest one.
Oliver Larding, a washed-up, crapulent hack, pleading for his life
before getting the Clarence treatment, tells Lionheart that he knows
what it is to suffer, because "I work for the Daily Mail".  . . .

[ . . . ]


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S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
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The S H A K S P E R Webpage <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

After Agincourt

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1088  Tuesday, 14 June 2005

From:           Peter Mottley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Tuesday, 14 Jun 2005 12:49:12 +0100
Subject:        After Agincourt

Just picked up your review of the Dogs of War production of After
Agincourt at Et Cetera Theatre in February.  You ask if anyone has
details.  As the author, I can let you have the following.

First written in 1986 for a friend, the actor Roy Heather (Only Fools
and Horses, Time Gentlemen Please, etc), and first performed at the
Kings Theatre, Southsea, directed by David Tudor.  Roy later performed
it at the Unicorn (Abingdon), the Colosseum (Oldham) and on tour round
the South and Midlands with the Stage One Company.  It has also had
productions featuring Gareth David Lloyd and John Giles.

In 1988 it was picked up by the BBC, and produced on Radio 3 by Alfred
Bradley, with Bob Hoskins playing Pistol.  This was Bob's first ever
radio play.

Reviews have included:
'It uses the modern vernacular without losing the richness of
Shakespeare' (The Observer)
'Exhilarating and full-blooded' (The Times)
'Tour de force' (Sunday Telegraph)
'Compelling' (The Guardian)
'A most extraordinary piece - very moving, very moral' (Bob Hoskins,
interviewed in the Radio Times)

(It was also called 'tedious and daft' by The Listener.  Can't win them
all...)

After Agincourt also rates a footnote in the Arden edition of
Shakespeare's Henry V.

Its companion piece, Before Nell, has also had a number of productions,
plus a tour, and was written in the mid-90s in response to a frequent
question following After Agincourt: 'Yes, but what happened to Nell
Quickly?'

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

New and Improved Lear

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 16.1086  Monday, 13 June 2005

From:           Joseph Egert <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date:           Friday, 10 Jun 2005 20:07:20 +0000
Subject: 16.1045 New and Improved Lear
Comment:        Re: SHK 16.1045 New and Improved Lear

David Basch writes, "Cordelia violates the Bible's cardinal word 'to
honor thy father'...that puts into orbit the calamities that in the end
consume her."

The voice of the patriarch is heard in the land! So, David Basch joins
Goneril in blaming the victim.

Who is most sinn'd against in this drama if not Christlike Cordelia,
come on her "Father's business...to redeem all sorrows"? It is the
fathers who fail to fairly honor their sons and daughters. These
self-absorbed patricians know neither their children nor themselves.
Nor, for that matter, do lords of the Earth like Lear know even their
subject children. After much trial and suffering, repentance may come,
but often too late to save the Cordelias of this world. Shakespeare will
not distort Nature's mirror to spare our feelings.

Love's neglect lies at the heart of the matter--a love craved by those
neglected ("Yet Edmund was belov'd").  Edmund, Goneril, and Regan have
always dwelt in the suburbs of their fathers' esteem and affection.
Their longing has decayed to predatory lust for land and power. Their
envy of the favored child has hardened their hearts. This envy carries
an ancient pedigree, harking back to Satan, jealous of God's love for
Adam and Jesus, the New Adam. Why else is Abel attacked by Cain, or
Joseph by his brothers? As for the descendants of C.ain and A.bel,
namely fiery Cornwall and moral Albany, it is yet unclear which of the
Dukes the King of Hosts "values most", or whether in fact we swear our
Gods in vain.

Joe Egert

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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