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Home :: Archive :: 2006 :: February ::
Deceitful Plays
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 17.0076  Sunday, 26 February 2006

[1] 	From: 	Arthur Lindley <
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	Date: 	Tuesday, 21 Feb 2006 00:19:46 +0800
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 17.0062 Deceitful Plays

[2] 	From: 	Larry Weiss <
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 >
	Date: 	Monday, 20 Feb 2006 13:51:41 -0500
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 17.0062 Deceitful Plays


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Arthur Lindley <
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Date: 		Tuesday, 21 Feb 2006 00:19:46 +0800
Subject: 17.0062 Deceitful Plays
Comment: 	Re: SHK 17.0062 Deceitful Plays

I don't know if any of the participants in this thread have mentioned 
it, but Bertrand Evans -- my undergraduate Shakespeare teacher at 
Berkeley -- wrote a couple of books dealing with deceit in Shakespeare, 
including deception of the audience.  The best known is Shakespeare's 
Tragic Practice (Oxford, 1980, if I'm not mistaken).  It's well worth 
consulting.

Regards,
Arthur Lindley

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Larry Weiss <
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 >
Date: 		Monday, 20 Feb 2006 13:51:41 -0500
Subject: 17.0062 Deceitful Plays
Comment: 	Re: SHK 17.0062 Deceitful Plays

 >"Early in HAMLET, Claudius chastises the inky-garbed Prince
 >for his unmanly grief as 'a fault to nature...whose common theme/Is
 >death of fathers.../From the first corse till he that died today...' Did
 >the first corpse Abel die a natural death? Does anyone in this tragedy,
 >parent or child, die a natural death? Is this Shakespeare's way of slyly
 >reminding us that unnatural manslaughter comes naturally to Fallen Man?"

Perhaps, but let us remember that this is not the only time WS makes the 
same point about ostentatious grief for a dead father.  At the beginning 
of AW/EW, the Countess admonishes Helena about the very thing: "No more 
of this, Helena.  Go to, no more!  lest it be rather thought you affect 
a sorrow than to have."  Shortly thereafter, Helena admits in soliloquy 
that she is not in fact grieving for her father.

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