2006

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 17.0119  Monday, 6 March 2006

[1] 	From: 	Marvin Bennet Krims <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Friday, 3 Mar 2006 11:51:44 -0500
	Subj: 	RE: SHK 17.0105 no country for old men?

[2] 	From: 	Jack Heller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Friday, 3 Mar 2006 14:58:18 -0500 (EST)
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 17.0105 no country for old men?


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Marvin Bennet Krims <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Friday, 3 Mar 2006 11:51:44 -0500
Subject: 17.0105 no country for old men?
Comment: 	RE: SHK 17.0105 no country for old men?

Judging from the Sonnets, Shakespeare seemed to have negative feelings 
about his own aging, even young as he was when he wrote them.
	
Does anyone have ideas about Shakespeare's own attitudes about aging and 
the aged.
	
Marvin Krims
	
[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Jack Heller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Friday, 3 Mar 2006 14:58:18 -0500 (EST)
Subject: 17.0105 no country for old men?
Comment: 	Re: SHK 17.0105 no country for old men?

I am surprised to find another listmember who has read The Old Law, 
which was co-written by Thomas Middleton, William Rowley, and Philip 
Massinger. Whenever the Oxford Middleton gets released, one benefit will 
be to have such plays more readily available. I would disagree with Mike 
Jensen's reference to the debate not being gender specific. In this 
play, the old law requires the deaths of the elderly at different ages 
for men and women. Sexual desire motivates getting rid of an old wife. 
(It has been a while since I last read the play, but I think women had 
to die at 60, men at 80.) The desire for inheritance motivates getting 
rid of an old man.  The Old Law is a mighty strange comedy, dated around 
1618.

Jack Heller

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Subscribe to Our Feeds

Search

Make a Donation

Consider making a donation to support SHAKSPER.