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Home :: Archive :: 2006 :: March ::
Shakespeare and Southwell
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 17.0161  Monday, 13 March 2006

[1] 	From: 	Bruce Young <
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	Date: 	Friday, 10 Mar 2006 10:31:53 -0700
	Subj: 	RE: SHK 17.0151 Shakespeare and Southwell

[2] 	From: 	Joseph Egert <
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	Date: 	Friday, 10 Mar 2006 23:01:59 +0000
	Subj: 	RE: SHK 17.0141 Shakespeare and Southwell

[3] 	From: 	Matthew Cossolotto <
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	Date: 	Sunday, 12 Mar 2006 15:22:01 -0500
	Subj: 	Shakespeare and Southwell


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Bruce Young <
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Date: 		Friday, 10 Mar 2006 10:31:53 -0700
Subject: 17.0151 Shakespeare and Southwell
Comment: 	RE: SHK 17.0151 Shakespeare and Southwell

Thanks to Sara Trevisan and Peter Bridgman for the information on 
Southwell and Shakespeare.  I was already aware of the Internet sites 
Sara mentions, but I appreciate being reminded that Michael Wood (the 
main source of recent published assertions on this matter) claims that 
Southwell was distantly related to Shakespeare "on his mother's side."

Question: By "his" does Wood mean Southwell's or Shakespeare's?  If he's 
thinking of Southwell's mother, then his claim contradicts Peter 
Bridgman's; if he's thinking of Shakespeare's mother, then he's perhaps 
referring to the same distant relationship Peter describes.

By the way, though that relationship goes back only five generations, it 
is much more convoluted than the 9th cousin once removed relationship I 
discovered.  For one thing, it involves no genetic link, but depends 
three times on a connection through marriage.  Peter's description could 
be boiled down to the following: Southwell had an aunt who had an aunt 
whose granddaughter was married to a third cousin of Shakespeare's.  Or 
alternatively, Southwell could have had first cousins who were second 
cousins with the wife of a third cousin of Shakespeare's.  That's so 
faint a relationship that I would want more solid evidence before 
feeling confident that Southwell and Shakespeare were aware of being 
related.

Two more bibliographic questions:

1. If I'm following, Southwell's letter to his cousin first appeared in 
1592 but without any reference to "W. S."  In what form did this letter 
appear?  (I.e., part of a larger book or what?)  Is there an STC number?

2. I looked at the 1616 edition of Southwell's "St. Peters Complaint" at 
Early English Books Online and found that the page that presumably says 
"To My Worthy Good Cosen Maister W. S." is missing.  Does the Huntington 
copy reproduced there have the page, but it was somehow not 
photographed?  Or are there copies elsewhere with the page?

Thanks,
Bruce Young

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Joseph Egert <
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Date: 		Friday, 10 Mar 2006 23:01:59 +0000
Subject: 17.0141 Shakespeare and Southwell
Comment: 	RE: SHK 17.0141 Shakespeare and Southwell

Bruce Young needs more info on the Southwell-Shakespeare connection.

Check out John Klause's essay "Catholic and Protestant, Jesuit and 
Jew..."(03) in Dennis Taylor's collection SHAKESPEARE AND THE CULTURE OF 
CHRISTIANITY IN EARLY MODERN ENGLAND(03) (no. 6 in the series: STUDIES 
IN RELIGION AND LITERATURE).  Klause's Note 13 cites several references 
addressing their ties. In the essay Klause tracks down a plethora of 
parallels between Southwell's life/works and the MERCHANT OF VENICE. 
Interestingly, Klause "prefigures" in 2003 my own conjecture on this 
List linking "Bellario" and Cardinal Bellarmino. An earlier version of 
the essay appears in RELIGION AND THE ARTS vol.7.1/2 (2003).

Hope this helps,
Joe Egert

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Matthew Cossolotto <
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Date: 		Sunday, 12 Mar 2006 15:22:01 -0500
Subject: 	Shakespeare and Southwell

Peter Bridgman wrote (below) that Venus and Adonis was published in 
1592, but wasn't the publication date April 1593?  If V&A was published 
AFTER Southwell's 1592 letter, how would this chronology affect item 2. 
below???

Regarding Southwell's visits to Southampton House, is there any record 
of Shakespeare visiting same?  If not, why not?

Matthew Cossolotto

 >2 - The letter was first published in 1592, the same year as 'Venus
 >and Adonis'.  In the letter Robert complains that "still the finest
 >wits are distilling Venus' rose ... playing with pagan toys".  His
 >letter ends "it rests in your will".
 >
 >3 - It may be in reaction to this criticism, and to Robert's arrest
 >(July 1592), that a chastened Shakespeare promised "a graver labour"
 >for his next poem.

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