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Home :: Archive :: 2006 :: March ::
Rents in Kind
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 17.0176  Wednesday, 15 March 2006

[1] 	From: 	Ros King <
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	Date: 	Tuesday, 14 Mar 2006 18:14:56 +0000
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 17.0166 Rents in Kind

[2] 	From: 	Sara Trevisan <
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	Date: 	Tuesday, 14 Mar 2006 21:28:02 +0100
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 17.0166 Rents in Kind

[3] 	From: 	John Drakakis <
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	Date: 	Wednesday, 15 Mar 2006 10:18:44 -0000
	Subj: 	RE: SHK 17.0166 Rents in Kind


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Ros King <
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Date: 		Tuesday, 14 Mar 2006 18:14:56 +0000
Subject: 17.0166 Rents in Kind
Comment: 	Re: SHK 17.0166 Rents in Kind

Payments in kind were made for all sorts of things. Children of the 
Chapel Royal would be given breakfast and a pair of gloves in recompense 
for a play performance at court or Inns of Court (e.g. BL Stowe MS 571, 
fol 36b); actors were regularly paid in costumes (e.g.  for the Prince 
of Wales investiture show on the Thames 1610), people  could be rewarded 
for their services with leasehold tenure of land,  or sinecure 
keeperships with associated benefits in kind. Patent  Rolls 8 March 1554 
record 'a grant for life in consideration of his  service to Richard 
Edwards [the poet and playwright] one of the  yeomen of the chamber, of 
the office of keeper of the Castle of  Kirkby in Kendal, Co. 
Westmoreland and of the park there, '. This post did carry wages of 4d 
per day but also rights to 'lopings and brusyngs and windfalls' from the 
park. Thomas Cawarden, Master of the Revels enjoyed benefits accruing 
from his keepership of Donnington Castle and of two areas of the park at 
Hampton Court - as well as more conventional rents as steward of 
Nonsuch, Banstead and Walton manors (Stowe Ms 71, fols 25v, 49). Then 
there are 'main-ports' offerings of loaves of bread made to their rector 
by parishioners in some parts of England in recompense of certain tythes 
(see Alice Walker's emendation of Cymbeline 5.5.110) and a citation in 
Blount, Law Dictionary, 1670, cited OED. I'm sure manorial rolls would 
yield  lots more rent-like payments - and this, of course, isn't even to 
  start to mention unofficial, back-hander type gifts in kind.

Best wishes,
Ros

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Sara Trevisan <
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Date: 		Tuesday, 14 Mar 2006 21:28:02 +0100
Subject: 17.0166 Rents in Kind
Comment: 	Re: SHK 17.0166 Rents in Kind

Dear Prof. Evans,

In the following site of the Harvard Law School hundreds of English 
deeds are mentioned (a great deal of which dating from the seventeenth 
century):
http://www.law.harvard.edu/library/collections/special/manuscripts/deeds/

As far as I could see, rents paid in the early 1600s seem to have been 
paid in the form of money: e.g. (from the site), (1614) rent: a 
peppercorn (nominal rent); (1609) rent: 26 s. 8 d; (1616) rent: 240, etc.

This is all I was able to find at the moment, without having access to 
the university library.

Hope it will help.

P.S. By the way, just this afternoon I read your 1994 note on N&Q on 
Fane's poems on Jonson for my M.A. dissertation on Mildmay Fane... A 
very nice coincidence.

Kindest regards,
Sara Trevisan

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		John Drakakis <
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Date: 		Wednesday, 15 Mar 2006 10:18:44 -0000
Subject: 17.0166 Rents in Kind
Comment: 	RE: SHK 17.0166 Rents in Kind

I'm not sure if the following refutes Fowler's claim, but Robert Evans 
might like to look at Jeaffreson's Records for the County of Middlesex. 
  I seem to remember that the Marmion family from Aynho was committed to 
giving one musket to the king' army in the 1620s.

The Muster Rolls would be the place to look I think.

Cheers,
John Drakakis

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