2006

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 17.0238  Tuesday, 28 March 2006

[1] 	From: 	Edmund Taft <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Tuesday, 28 Mar 2006 08:42:37 -0500
	Subj: 	Shakespeare in Time Magazine (Europe)

[2] 	From: 	Colin Cox <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Tuesday, 28 Mar 2006 08:31:13 -0800
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 17.0231 Shakespeare in Time Magazine (Europe)


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Edmund Taft <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Tuesday, 28 Mar 2006 08:42:37 -0500
Subject: 	Shakespeare in Time Magazine (Europe)

Marcus Dahl asks, "Who do you want to trust - Gary Taylor or Ben 
Jonson?" Boy, that's a tough one! Seriously, we all recognize "genius" 
in mathematics and in music: most of us know that we can't write music 
the way Duke Ellington could or theorize mathematically the way Einstein 
could. So why does postmodernism reject the idea of literary genius?

Some people are more gifted than others. It's a fact.

Perplexedly,
Ed Taft

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Colin Cox <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Tuesday, 28 Mar 2006 08:31:13 -0800
Subject: 17.0231 Shakespeare in Time Magazine (Europe)
Comment: 	Re: SHK 17.0231 Shakespeare in Time Magazine (Europe)

I think it is often missed that the writers Shakespeare first 
encountered upon his entry into London,  the 'University Wits', Lyly, 
Watson, Greene, Peele, Marlowe (and though not a 'Wit', his roommate 
Kyd) were all dead and/or gone by the mid 1590's.

Lyly, the early master, was off running across the moors of Yorkshire. 
Watson, to whom Shakespeare was often compared, was dead by 1592. 
Greene, London's greatest journalist, and a wit from whom William had no 
trouble borrowing (Winter's Tale, more for 'Coney Catching' than 
'Pandosto') had 'rotted' away by 1592. Kyd (passed away in tortured 
misery by 1594) I would suggest was a better dramatist than Shakespeare. 
Peele (faded into oblivion by '96), the early pioneer of blank verse, 
gave way to the great innovator and probably the greatest 'writer' of 
the early 1590's Kit Marlowe (murdered in '93, all conspiracy theories 
aside).

If indeed 'no man is an island', Shakespeare's ability as a poet, writer 
and thinker is in no small part due to his good fortune in encountering 
these remarkable 'University Wits' early in his career.

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