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Home :: Archive :: 2006 :: April ::
Chandos Portrait Probably Genuine
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 17.0285  Wednesday, 5 April 2006

[1] 	From: 	Clark J. Holloway <
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	Date: 	Tuesday, 4 Apr 2006 19:03:57 -0700
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 17.0277 Chandos Portrait Probably Genuine

[2] 	From: 	Peter Farey <
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	Date: 	Wednesday, 5 Apr 2006 12:45:14 +0100
	Subj: 	The Stratford Monument's Epigraph


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Clark J. Holloway <
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Date: 		Tuesday, 4 Apr 2006 19:03:57 -0700
Subject: 17.0277 Chandos Portrait Probably Genuine
Comment: 	Re: SHK 17.0277 Chandos Portrait Probably Genuine

Gerald E. Downs:

 >When Bill Lloyd reported that "Clark Holloway concludes," he would have
 >been more accurate to note that Holloway's analysis and most of his
 >material derives from Diana Price's extensive "Reconsidering
 >Shakespeare's Monument" (Review of English Studies, May 1997), which
 >Holloway himself properly cited (after only one nudge).

No offense intended towards Mr. Downs, but this is not quite correct.

Back in 1999, Mr. Downs' photograph of Dugdale's sketch was being rather 
freely circulated, without attribution or context, on the 
humanities.lit.authors.shakespeare (HLAS) newsgroup.  I received a copy 
of it, and immediately noticed discrepancies between the sketch and the 
Hollar engraving.  I had already gathered the evidence, done an 
analysis, reached my conclusion, and posted my findings on HLAS before 
David Kathman had the unfortunate duty of informing me that I had been 
anticipated by Ms. Price.  Anyone wishing to verify the timeline, 
including the point at which I learned of Ms. Price's article, may 
search Google Groups for a thread entitled, "Dugdale's Phantom Leopards."

My web site essay is based on the discussions in that thread, and I 
believe that I had always acknowledged Ms. Price's precedence in the 
discovery on my site-though Mr. Downs may have missed it on his first 
perusal.

I'm merely an amateur Shakespeare enthusiast, and have precious little 
reputation to worry about, but it took no "nudging" on Mr. Downs' part 
for me to acknowledge Ms. Price's work.  Given that we were both started 
our analysis with the same evidence, Mr. Downs' photograph, it shouldn't 
be too surprising that we both came to the same conclusion.

- Clark

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Peter Farey <
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Date: 		Wednesday, 5 Apr 2006 12:45:14 +0100
Subject: 	The Stratford Monument's Epigraph

Joe Egert wrote, in the less and less aptly named "Chandos Portrait 
Probably Genuine" thread:

 >   --1853: Fairholt engraving of current Monument effigy, detailed
 >and accurate, but without pen. The inscription's first word:
 >"IVDICIO". They finally got it right!
 >
 >Fellow resolutes, I welcome any corrections or additions.

As regards the accuracy of the epigraph, the earliest clearly reliable 
illustration that I have been able to find is in the 1896 edition of J. 
O. Halliwell-Phillipps's "Outlines of the Life of Shakespeare", a copy 
of which I have at <http://www2.prestel.co.uk/rey/halliwell.jpg>.  It 
seems to have been obtained either by a photographic process or by a 
rubbing of some kind, but I'm not sure which.

If we take this as the best indication of how it appeared originally, 
then it is salutary to note that - as far as I can ascertain - there has 
*never* been an accurate transcript of the whole thing published, either 
before or since! Even Halliwell-Phillipps retained the inaccurate 
transcript that he had included in all earlier editions of "Outlines". 
The most accurate version I have seen is in the Riverside "Complete 
Works", but even they omit the comma after the words "Far more", with a 
footnote saying that there might be one there.

I gather that the monument was vandalized in 1974, and the chance taken 
to refurbish it. There is a fascinating photograph held in Stratford's 
Shakespeare Library showing the bust (with one cushion tassel missing) 
perched on a pile of rubble, and the epigraph completely obliterated by 
a coat of paint. Interestingly, in redoing it, the writer again departed 
from the Halliwell-Phillipps version: the question mark at the end of 
the first line disappeared, as did the colon after the word "DIDE", and 
the word "CANST" ('read if thou canst') was changed to "GANST".

Mind you, it would seem that the refurbishment was perhaps not watched 
as closely as it might have been, since I gather that the putti were put 
back the wrong way round (i.e. with legs pointing inward) and that it 
was some three years before anyone noticed!

Peter Farey

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