2006

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 17.0289  Friday, 7 April 2006

[1] 	From: 	David Evett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Wednesday, 5 Apr 2006 15:08:49 -0400
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 17.0278 Monsieur La Far

[2] 	From: 	Grant Smith <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Wednesday, 5 Apr 2006 17:32:58 -0700
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 17.0278 Monsieur La Far

[3] 	From: 	Stephanie Kydd <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Thursday, 6 Apr 2006 08:08:03 -0700 (PDT)
	Subj: 	RE: Significance of the name "La Far" in KL 4.3.8, posted by 
Dennis Taylor


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		David Evett <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Wednesday, 5 Apr 2006 15:08:49 -0400
Subject: 17.0278 Monsieur La Far
Comment: 	Re: SHK 17.0278 Monsieur La Far

For what it is worth, none of the Marechals de France in the Wikipedia 
list, from the establishment of the office in 1180 through 1605 and 
beyond, bore that name.

David Evett

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Grant Smith <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Wednesday, 5 Apr 2006 17:32:58 -0700
Subject: 17.0278 Monsieur La Far
Comment: 	Re: SHK 17.0278 Monsieur La Far

Dennis Taylor <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>

 >Is there any significance to the name, Monsieur La Far (KLear 4.3.8)?

I can't find a parallel to any historical personage.  So my guess would 
be that Shakespeare may be doing a little wordplay here with the French 
word for wax, "fart," and/or the English word for iron, "fer."

If the idea of iron is suggested, the meaning is appropriately ironical 
to an English audience for a French soldier.  At the same time, the 
pronunciation would sound like the French word for wax, and so the "real 
meaning" would mock the soldier's prospects in war.

Could Shakespeare's aural imagination have been that lively?!

Of course, the French king is a good guy, and so is spared the 
embarrassment of defeat.

Grant Smith

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Stephanie Kydd <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Thursday, 6 Apr 2006 08:08:03 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 	RE: Significance of the name "La Far" in KL 4.3.8, posted by 
Dennis Taylor

RE: Significance of the name "La Far" in KL 4.3.8, posted by Dennis Taylor

Shakespeare usually doesn't choose a name arbitrarily (even one used in 
passing), so there is some significance.  I can't claim with any 
certainty what it is, but I offer the following conjectures:

(1) 'lafar' is a recognized variant of 'l'affaire' ('A Glossary of 
Lingua Franca', http://www.uwm.edu/~corre/franca/go.html); the English 
word 'affair' (derived from the French) is 'a military 'action' or 
engagement of undefined character' (OED), which makes 'La Far' an apt 
name for a French marshal;

(2) There may be simple play on the English word 'far', meaning that the 
troop support is remote.

- Stephie Kydd
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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