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Home :: Archive :: 2006 :: April ::
Monsieur La Far
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 17.0301  Monday, 10 April 2006

[1] 	From: 	Bob Marks <
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 >
	Date: 	Friday, 7 Apr 2006 16:40:32 -0700 (PDT)
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 17.0278 Monsieur La Far

[2] 	From: 	Joseph Egert <
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 >
	Date: 	Sunday, 09 Apr 2006 18:13:07 +0000
	Subj: 	RE: SHK 17.0278 Monsieur La Far


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Bob Marks <
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Date: 		Friday, 7 Apr 2006 16:40:32 -0700 (PDT)
Subject: 17.0278 Monsieur La Far
Comment: 	Re: SHK 17.0278 Monsieur La Far

I have a note concerning this at: 
http://users.bigpond.net.au/catchus/Lear%20text.html#_ftn241

My reading of the play has Cordelia and France disguised as Fool and, at 
this point, Gentleman. France never did go back to his home but sent for 
troops to come and rescue Lear.

I believe Kent is actually talking with France here but doesn't know it 
and France is playing with Kent.

In Love's Labour's Lost we have someone being called "Monsieur the nice" 
which has an obvious meaning. Zinevra, of Baccassio's The Decameron, who 
lies behind the character of Imogen, takes on the disguised name 
"Sicurano da Finale", which can be roughly translated secure at last, 
expressive of her feeling of security. "Monsieur le Fer", the name of 
the French Soldier in King Henry V (4.4.27) is clearly chosen for Pistol 
to respond to with "I'll fer him, and firk him, and ferret him...." 
Here in Lear "Monsieur la Far" suggests someone who is afar off as 
opposed to standing in one's presence, and is France's way of playing 
with Kent who still does not recognise him, in the same way as the 
disguised Vincentio plays with Lucio in Measure for Measure.

Time does not permit me to go into this more fully here.

Bob Marks
Sydney

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Joseph Egert <
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Date: 		Sunday, 09 Apr 2006 18:13:07 +0000
Subject: 17.0278 Monsieur La Far
Comment: 	RE: SHK 17.0278 Monsieur La Far

Dennis Taylor asks:

 >Is there any significance to the name, Monsieur La Far (KLear
 >4.3.8)?

Robert Marks in his 1997 post  (SHK 8.0340) argues: "Monsieur La Far 
like all Shakespeare's Monsieurs, is clearly a contrived name [...] 
meant to  suggest someone who is afar off, as opposed to France himself 
who is very near!" In this, Marks seems to be in concert with the few 
editors who address the issue.

Regaeds,
Joe Egert

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