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Home :: Archive :: 2006 :: May ::
Conjuring in Shakespeare's Time
The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 17.0480  Monday, 22 May 2006

[1] 	From: 	John W. Kennedy <
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 	Date: 	Sunday, 21 May 2006 16:01:13 -0400
 	Subj: 	Re: SHK 17.0467 Conjuring in Shakespeare's Time

[2] 	From: 	Jeffrey Jordan <
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 >
 	Date: 	Sunday, 21 May 2006 16:54:09 -0500
 	Subj: 	Re: SHK 17.0467 Conjuring in Shakespeare's Time


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		John W. Kennedy <
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Date: 		Sunday, 21 May 2006 16:01:13 -0400
Subject: 17.0467 Conjuring in Shakespeare's Time
Comment: 	Re: SHK 17.0467 Conjuring in Shakespeare's Time

I suppose you know Reginald Scot's "The Discoverie of Witchcraft", but you 
do not mention it.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Jeffrey Jordan <
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Date: 		Sunday, 21 May 2006 16:54:09 -0500
Subject: 17.0467 Conjuring in Shakespeare's Time
Comment: 	Re: SHK 17.0467 Conjuring in Shakespeare's Time

The term "jugled" appears in Hamlet, spoken by Laertes.  Act 4 Scene  5. 
It is not a direct reference to sleight of hand, at the point where it's 
used, but the word does refer to deception.  Laertes is demanding from 
Claudius information about his father's death, and says:

Laer: How came he dead, I'll not be jugled with,

A Second Quarto facsimile which shows the line is available from ISE, 
here:

http://ise.uvic.ca/Library/facsimile/book/BL_Q2_Ham/76/? 
size=small&view_mode=normal&content_type=

The line is on the left page of the image, about 1/4 of the way down.

So, Shakespeare knew of "jugling" well enough to use it as a term for 
deception, anyway.

In reference to deceptive handling of the foils at the fencing match, 
Claudius uses the term "shuffling" if that's of any interest to you.   The 
word "shuffling" is also used earlier in reference to deception, spoken by 
Claudius in the "Prayer Scene."  The first use is spelled "shufling" with 
one "f" and the second with two f's in the original Second Quarto 
printing.

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