2006

A Roof on the Globe?

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 17.0440  Thursday, 11 May 2006

[1] 	From: 	David Crystal <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Wednesday, 10 May 2006 13:15:13 +0100
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 17.0418 A Roof on the Globe?

[2] 	From: 	Jeremy Fiebig <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Wednesday, 10 May 2006 08:58:41 -0400
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 17.0427 A Roof on the Globe?

[3] 	From: 	Elliott Stone <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Wednesday, 10 May 2006 17:20:48 -0400
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 17.0427 A Roof on the Globe?

[4] 	From: 	John Crowley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Thursday, 11 May 2006 08:00:27 -0400
	Subj: 	Roof on the Globe


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		David Crystal <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Wednesday, 10 May 2006 13:15:13 +0100
Subject: 17.0418 A Roof on the Globe?
Comment: 	Re: SHK 17.0418 A Roof on the Globe?

 >I feel somewhat dismayed by the thought that the Globe's raison
 >d'etre is so comprehensively nullified by putting a roof on it!

'Roof' is perhaps a misleading word. It is more an enclosing, using the 
system described. You can still see the sky, and the groundlings will 
still get wet. I've seen the first drawings and they look really 
exciting - and well within the spirit of the Globe, which is to explore 
the dramatic potential of the space. The effect as the audience enters 
the theatre should be quite something.

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Jeremy Fiebig <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Wednesday, 10 May 2006 08:58:41 -0400
Subject: 17.0427 A Roof on the Globe?
Comment: 	Re: SHK 17.0427 A Roof on the Globe?

The sentiments expressed in Wednesday's posts reflect the willingness 
among audiences and scholars to see the Globe become something other 
than it's been.  With some notable exceptions, the Globe has to this 
point avoided becoming a "designer's theatre" -- one in which the 
elements of production outweigh the very basic requirements of the text.

At the risk of tooting too loudly the horn of original practices, the 
move by the Globe appears in some measure to deny itself -- the 
building, and the imagination required to engage that building and its 
players.  Instead of "playing" dark and funereal in broad daylight, the 
audience is caused to "feel" dark and funereal by an element that 
Shakespeare presumably did not have at his beck.

I see this move as a lack on ingenuity rather than an application of it.

[3]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Elliott Stone <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Wednesday, 10 May 2006 17:20:48 -0400
Subject: 17.0427 A Roof on the Globe?
Comment: 	Re: SHK 17.0427 A Roof on the Globe?

I believe that a very good case could be made that every Shakespeare 
play was written to be performed indoors. There may be those critics 
that believe the plays were written to be performed first at the Globe 
but I am not persuaded. Tom Stoppard might have written the script for 
"Shakespeare in Love" showing Queen Elizabeth viewing R&J at her local 
playhouse but my sneaking belief is that they took the play to her.

There are many plays within the play in the Shakespeare Canon and they 
all were performed indoors. The most famous, of course, is the Hamlet 
Mousetrap performed in a castle. The "rude mechanicals" might have 
rehearsed outdoors but even they performed their Thisbe before the Court 
in a palace!

Best,
Elliott H. Stone

[4]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		John Crowley <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Thursday, 11 May 2006 08:00:27 -0400
Subject: 	Roof on the Globe

Is there clear evidence that Elizabethan theaters didn't have such 
screens?  Frances Yates and others have shown how much the Elizabethan 
theater builders thought of themselves as heirs of the classical 
theater, wanting for instance to replicate the (now quite 
unintelligible) sound amplification system described by Vitruvius. 
Maybe they adopted this concept too.

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Faith Youth

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 17.0439  Thursday, 11 May 2006

From: 		Jon Ciccarelli <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Wednesday, 10 May 2006 13:15:02 -0400
Subject: 	Faith Youth

Can someone on the list elaborate a bit on the connection with William 
Herbert and the fair youth? It seems that he is the prevailing candidate 
these days, but I don't see how this can be on two different fronts. 
One, what is the connection between WS and the Herberts during his 
lifetime? Other than the posthumous dedication of the First Folio to 
William Herbert, I can't seem to locate any connection between WS and 
Herbert to warrant such a close relationship.  Second, is the dating of 
the earliest sonnets.  Love's Labours Lost (c1594) has one of the 
strongest connections to the sonnet cycle.  If we are to assume that 
there is a biographical backstory to them and Rosaline is a 
representation of the Dark Lady, most of the "Dark Lady" sonnets would 
have played out before writing LLL, possibly 1592-93.  Herbert was 
between 12 to 14 at the time.  Wouldn't he have been too young at this 
point to have been the recipient, especially with the first seventeen 
begging him to marry? Any elaboration is greatly appreciated.

Regards
Jon Ciccarelli

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Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

What happens to the Fool in _Lear_?

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 17.0437  Thursday, 11 May 2006

From: 		Noel Sloboda <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Wednesday, 10 May 2006 22:33:00 -0400 (EDT)
Subject: 	What happens to the Fool in _Lear_?

Greetings,

Please lend me insight into what is commonly thought to happen to the 
Fool in _Lear_ after III.vi.  I recognize that the Fool doubling as 
Cordelia might explain why the Fool needs to disappear.  But in relation 
to the plot of the play, where (and why) does the Fool go?  These 
questions perplex me, especially if Lear's "My poor fool is hanged" 
refers not just to Cordelia but to the Fool.  How could he/why would he 
have ended up hung?  Is there any critical consensus?  Dramatic tradition?

Thank you for your assistance.

- Noel Sloboda

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Female Hamlets

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 17.0438  Thursday, 11 May 2006

From: 		Abigail Quart <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Thursday, 11 May 2006 02:12:43 -0400
Subject: 17.0424 Female Hamlets
Comment: 	RE: SHK 17.0424 Female Hamlets

John Crowley wrote:

 >"At Joseph Papp's Public Theater in the 70s Diane Venora played Hamlet and
 >brought tears to my eyes (or maybe it was just Hamlet that brought tears
 >to my eyes, again). The costuming was Napoleonic, lots of uniforms."

First, in deference to Joe Papp whom I was told specifically did NOT 
want the Public named after him, in the 70s it was still just the Public 
Theater.

Second, Mr. Crowley's reference to the Napoleonic costuming reminded me 
of the one thing that I do recall about that production, which was being 
completely distracted by the bizarre decision to costume Ophelia as a 
replica of Gail Merrifield, Joe Papp's wife (although I don't recall if 
they were yet married at the time). I realize it was an homage or 
in-joke which, judging by Mr. Crowley's reaction, did not affect the 
general audience, but it was so jarring to me that I don't remember 
anything else about the production.

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Regional Accents

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 17.0436  Thursday, 11 May 2006

From: 		Donald Bloom <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Wednesday, 10 May 2006 12:02:51 -0500
Subject: 	Regional Accents

Some months ago, pursuant to a discussion of Shakespeare's comic 
depiction of some accents, I asked a related question that got shuffled 
aside in the ongoing discussion. I find, however, that I am still 
interested in the question so I am putting again.

To what extent did the English aristocracy of Shakespeare's time display 
regional accents associated with their titles? Is that where they were 
always from? Is that what they would have learned from their parents (or 
those who raised them)? Would they have learned some "correct" 
pronunciation as commonly happened later?

Up through the time of the Conquest, of course, they would all speak 
with their regional dialect. After that they would speak English (if 
they knew any) with a Norman French accent. But by Chaucer's time, or a 
bit before, they started speaking English as their first language-but 
with what accent?

With the middle and lower classes, I presume, the question does not 
arise. They learned English from their parents who were usually from the 
same region. Shakespeare, for example, would have had a Warwickshire 
accent. Ben Jonson a London one. Correct?

But what of the nobility? Was there a prestige accent that they would 
have learned, especially if they wished to be important at court? Or not?

Does anybody have any knowledge of this matter? Or know of a good source 
that I may be able to locate and consult?

And finally is there any connection to the plays? Has anyone noted any 
regional accents beyond a few Welshmen and the Princess of France?

Cheers,
don

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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