2006

Price of Academic Journals

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 17.1109  Saturday, 30 December 2006

[1] 	From: 	Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Monday, 25 Dec 2006 21:13:14 -0000
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 17.1107 Price of Academic Journals

[2] 	From: 	Harry Connors <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
	Date: 	Thursday, 28 Dec 2006 01:27:09 +0000
	Subj: 	Re: SHK 17.1107 Price of Academic Journals


[1]-----------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Gabriel Egan <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Monday, 25 Dec 2006 21:13:14 -0000
Subject: 17.1107 Price of Academic Journals
Comment: 	Re: SHK 17.1107 Price of Academic Journals

The best response to the spiralling cost of traditional journals is the 
Open Access movement, which advocates free publication of research 
outcomes on the Internet. The movement is rapidly gaining adherents even 
inside governments. In July 2004 of the House of Commons Science and 
Technical Committee, part of the United Kingdom government, delivered 
its 10th report in which it unequivocally supported Open Access for 
scientific, technical, and medical publishing. How such things might 
work out in the Arts and Humanities-where most of the research is not 
directly funded by a sponsor-is hard to say. To discuss this matter, 
there is a panel on Open Access at the Renaissance Society of America 
meeting in Miami in March 2007. The meeting programme can be had at

    www.rsa.org

The proposal for the panel, with links to further reading on the subject 
of Open Access, can be had at

    www.GabrielEgan.com/RSA

Gabriel Egan

[2]-------------------------------------------------------------
From: 		Harry Connors <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Thursday, 28 Dec 2006 01:27:09 +0000
Subject: 17.1107 Price of Academic Journals
Comment: 	Re: SHK 17.1107 Price of Academic Journals

Frankly, in my opinion, professors are reaping what they have sown.

First, two quick disclaimers. I am not specifically attacking anyone. If 
you are guilty, you will know. Also, I am neither a professor nor a 
student--at least not a student for a few decades--but my daughter, who 
is an English Lit grad student, tells me that nothing has changed since 
I was in school.

It is risible for professors to complain about the cost of journals. You 
have ignored the complaints of your students about the cost of textbooks 
for decades. you persist in choosing more expensive textbooks over less 
expensive ones. You insist on the latest editions, thus depriving your 
students of the ability to sell their textbooks after the class is over 
or the ability to buy used textbooks. Tell the textbook publishers "No!" 
They're the same ones who publish the journals you complain of.

Of course, not everyone is to blame. And, Mr. Shevlin is correct when he 
notes that the fewer people who subscribe to a journal, the higher the 
cost must be. Maybe some of the commercial journals should fail. Would 
the loss be that great? If I were a professor I would be heavily pruning 
my subscriptions. Certainly, I wouldn't need subscriptions to any 
journal carried by my library. And, I would be talking to colleagues 
about sharing subscriptions. Refusal to spend the money is the best way 
to get the publishers to listen.

Harry Connors

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

King Lear Anniversary

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 17.1108  Saturday, 30 December 2006

From: 		Al Magary <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Tuesday, 26 Dec 2006 15:02:21 -0800
Subject: 	King Lear Anniversary

"An unhappy birthday for Shakespeare's tragic King Lear"
By Louise Jury, Arts Correspondent
The Independent, 26 December 2006

http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/this_britain/article2103725.ece

Four hundred years ago today the first known performance of one of 
William Shakespeare's most powerful and heart-rending plays was 
presented at the court of James I at Whitehall.

Richard Burbage, the greatest actor of the age, is believed to have 
performed the title role as King Lear, the monarch who divided his 
kingdom and went mad.

The subject was tailor-made for James, who had been king of Scotland for 
36 years when he ascended to the English throne in 1603 on the death of 
Elizabeth I.

He was desperately trying to unite the parliaments of London and 
Edinburgh, so a cautionary tale of the perils of division must have been 
music to his ears.

But while the political ramifications of Lear would have been clear to 
the contemporary audience, it is the human drama that has resonated 
through centuries.

As the director Richard Eyre observes in a documentary about the play on 
Radio 4 today, while it might not seem festive, the family row at the 
heart of it makes it curiously apt for Christmas.

Actors such as Anthony Hopkins, Laurence Olivier, Orson Welles, Nigel 
Hawthorne and Brian Cox and even one actress - Kathryn Hunter - have 
tackled a part which the actor Ian Holm said required "enormous stamina".

Jonathan Bate, the Shakespearean scholar, said he used to regard it as 
Shakespeare's supreme achievement. "There have been many times in 
history when people have said it's Shakespeare's greatest play," he 
said. These days, he considers the Bard's work too diverse to decide. 
"But it's a play that Shakespeare obviously spent a lot of time working 
on, exploring huge questions, not only about politics, but about sanity 
and madness and primal emotions - family loyalty, love and hate."

The work was based on a story about a king called Ler, Leir or Lyr who 
was part of British and Irish mythology. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the Welsh 
bishop, recounted it in his Historia Regum Britanniae in the 12th 
century and Raphael Holinshed retold it in his own Chronicles of 
England, Scotland and Ireland in 1577.

It is possible, however, that Shakespeare's main source was a play 
called The True Chronicle History of King Leir and his three daughters, 
Goneril, Regan and Cordelia, which was published shortly before his own 
version was presented at court.

Professor Bate said plays were normally premiered at public theatres to 
refine them for court presentation. But in the second half of 1606, the 
theatres were closed because of the plague, so the first recorded 
mention, on Boxing Day, was probably the premiere.

Described by Shelley as "the most perfect specimen of dramatic poetry 
existing in the world", the play's performance career has been troubled.

It first earned popularity in 1681, when the Irish poet and dramatist 
Nahum Tate massacred the text by axing the role of the Fool, which he 
considered inappropriate to tragedy, and writing a new, happy ending in 
which Lear and Cordelia survive and she marries Edgar.

David Garrick, the great actor-manager of the 18th century, questioned 
Tate's reworking and created his own amalgam, cutting more than 200 of 
Tate's lines, but keeping the happy ending. Critics remained convinced 
that Shakespeare's tragic conclusion, in which Cordelia is hanged and 
Lear dies of a broken heart, was too overwhelming.

There followed a period when the play was not performed at all, in 
deference to the supposed madness of George III.

When Edmund Kean, a popular actor, revived it in the 1820s, deaths and 
all, the reaction was such that he reverted to Tate's ending after three 
performances.

Only in 1838 was a full Shakespearean version presented again, by the 
English actor-manager William Charles Macready.

Even so, further efforts were made to bowdlerise the script. Henry 
Irving axed nearly half of Shakespeare's text in 1892 to reduce the 
violence and sexuality.

It was the 20th century before any reverence for the text returned - 
along with new interpretations, including Andrew McCullough's 1953 film 
with Orson Welles in the title role and the Japanese director Akira 
Kurosawa's 1985 adaptation, Ran.

For actors, it remains a monumental challenge. "It's often regarded as 
the Everest for a Shakespearean actor," Professor Bate said. The next to 
assault the mountain is Sir Ian McKellen, who returns to the stage in 
Stratford in March, directed by Trevor Nunn.

Nunn said: "I have been looking forward to the fulfilment of the vow Ian 
McKellen and I made that one day we would do King Lear together."

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

BBC World Service King Lear

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 17.1106  Sunday, 24 December 2006

From: 		Philip Parr <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Thursday, 21 Dec 2006 17:53:05 -0000
Subject: 	BBC World Service King Lear

This may be of interest - the various World Service bands are available 
from the BBC website, and of course there will be an easy opportunity to 
listen directly on line or later (I imagine) through the very good BBC 
listen again facility.

World Drama: King Lear

http://er.bsysmail.com/go.asp?/bBBC001/qI4C133/xU56ES

A special BBC World Service production of William Shakespeare's tragedy 
King Lear, recorded at the Globe Theatre in London earlier this year, 
marks the 400th anniversary of the first performance of the play. The 
all-star cast includes Philip Madoc as Lear, Fiona Shaw as Goneril, 
Deborah Findlay as Regan and Andrew Sachs as the Fool.

23 December - programme times
Australasia: Sat 0801 rpt Sun 0201, 1001; East Asia: Sat 0801 rpt Sun 1001;
South Asia: Sat 2201 rpt Sun1001, 1501; East Africa: Sat 1801 rpt Sun 0101,
0801; West Africa: Sat 2101 rpt Mon 0001; Middle East: Sat 1801 rpt Sun
0001, 1001; Europe: Sat 2001 rpt Sun 0201, 2201; Americas: Sat 2001 rpt Sun
0201, Mon 0601
(115 mins)

Philip Parr, Director
Bath Shakespeare Festival
www.theatreroyal.org.uk/main/shakespearefest06.html

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

Price of Academic Journals

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 17.1107  Sunday, 24 December 2006

From: 		Clay Shevlin <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Friday, 22 Dec 2006 03:06:12 -0800
Subject: 17.1055 Price of Academic Journals
Comment: 	RE: SHK 17.1055 Price of Academic Journals

 >Stanford University has held public discussions
 >for the past couple of years about the price of
 >academic journals what Stanford faculty might
 >do about it. Since this may be of interest to a
 >wider audience, I have supplied a link below so
 >that you may see what was discussed at the most
 >recent colloquium. It begins:

  >>Although there was little clear consensus about
 >>strategy among presenters, faculty and staff at a
 >>Nov. 6 colloquium on issues in scholarly publishing,
 >>there were two points on which almost everyone
 >>agreed: The high costs for journal subscriptions charged
 >>by commercial publishers in recent years are unsustainable,
 >>and the ability to distribute articles electronically has
 >>fundamentally changed academic research and publishing.

 >If this is of interest, you may read the article here:

 >http://news-service.stanford.edu/news/2006/november15/journal-111506.html

Thanks to Mike Jensen for the reference to Barbara Palmer's article. 
Interesting reading, prompting one to wonder if the cable TV companies 
are the ones who own the for-profit academic journals...

I noted Prof. Bergstrom's (Dept. Economics, U.C. Santa Barbara) comment 
that "[p]rices [of academic journals] should be decreasing rather than 
increasing, since the ability of scholars to publish papers on their own 
websites has reduced the value of journal subscriptions."

Given the rest of the discussion in Ms. Palmer's article - most notably 
the fact alluded to by Prof. Bergstrom: that a rather high percentage of 
articles appearing in such journals are available, without cost, on the 
internet - it's not at all clear that Prof. Bergstrom's conclusion 
should follow.  If the majority of such articles are available on the 
internet for free, then that might cause a material reduction in journal 
subscriptions.  And with such a reduction in subscriptions would come a 
reduction in revenues.  But, as those involved in the publishing 
business are aware, certain and significant costs of producing a journal 
are fixed and unrelated to the number of subscribers.  Thus, with a 
significant decrease in subscriptions, per-copy production costs could 
increase dramatically and thus compel the publisher to raise 
subscription pricing.

Now, with such a brief article, it's impossible to know what else Prof. 
  Bergstrom said in relation to this claim, including his assumptions, 
caveats, etc.  So my comments are not intended as a criticism, but 
rather an observation, and a rather simplistic one at that, since other 
factors affect academic journal pricing.

Clay Shevlin

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

The Shepheardes Calendar in WordHoard

The Shakespeare Conference: SHK 17.1105  Sunday, 24 December 2006

From: 		Martin Mueller <This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.>
Date: 		Friday, 22 Dec 2006 11:44:07 -0600
Subject: 	The Shepheardes Calendar in WordHoard

Since readers of Shakespeare sometimes read Spenser as well, may I draw 
attention to the fact that The Shepheardes Calendar has been added to 
WordHoard (http://wordhoard.northwestern.edu).

This text with its odd combination of an aggressively rustic diction and 
an aggressively learned set of marginal notes by the mysterious EK 
offers a good example of the annotation capabilities of WordHoard.  In 
this instance annotations that were part of the original text are 
displayed in an annotation panel in the same field of vision as the text 
column.

The annotation panel that supports the display of pre-existing 
annotation can also be used for user contributed annotations. We have 
prototypes of WordHoard with user annotation working at Northwestern.  I 
have used it in several classes as the basis for assignments where 
students were asked to make close observations about word usage and 
report their findings as annotations to the text. Some excellent student 
work has resulted from this approach, and it offers a very easy way for 
students to look at each other's work in the immediately relevant context.

Developing a robust framework for user annotation with the appropriate 
security and permissions regime is high on our agenda. In the meantime, 
we would like to hear from people who might be interested in this 
capability, and I think we can support--and would learn from-- some 
classroom experiments at other institutions.

I will be delighted to provide more information.

Martin Mueller
Professor of English and Classics
Northwestern University

_______________________________________________________________
S H A K S P E R: The Global Shakespeare Discussion List
Hardy M. Cook, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
The S H A K S P E R Web Site <http://www.shaksper.net>

DISCLAIMER: Although SHAKSPER is a moderated discussion list, the 
opinions expressed on it are the sole property of the poster, and the 
editor assumes no responsibility for them.

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